Election signs at polling locations

On the election date (including pre-polling), independent candidates and registered political parties are permitted to have election signs at polling locations. These election signs can be static or hand held (including waving placards).

You do not need approval from Brisbane City Council to display election signs, as long as you comply with the relevant conditions.

Election signs are not permitted in Council parks or malls without written approval from Council. 

Election signs at polling locations other than City Hall on the election date

Registered political parties or independent candicates may display election signs at polling location footpaths on the election date (including pre-polling) as part of an election display. An election display is the area in which a custodian has responsibility for the election signs as well as any tables or chairs.

You do not need Council approval for an election display on the footpath, as long as you comply with the following conditions:

  • each registered political party or independent candidate may only erect one election display at each entrance to the polling place
  • election signs must not obstruct pedestrians or traffic, constitute a safety hazard or interfere with public infrastructure
  • no election signs are to be erected or placed on a median strip or roundabout
  • a custodian must not be more than six metres away from any sign in the election display at any time
  • the maximum number of four election signs may be displayed per election display
  • a double-sided election sign is counted as two signs
  • the maximum size of each election sign is 0.6 square metres
  • if the election sign involves the use of digital media, the sign must only use static images (i.e. no animation or moving pictures)
  • continuous signage devices may be erected provided they are not attached or affixed to any Council infrastructure or asset.

Other signs advocating for a particular cause or issue may be included in an election display as part of the maximum number of signs, with permission of the custodian. If a sign advocating for a particular cause or issue is not part of an election display, written approval from Council is required.

Election signs in the King George Square specified area

The King George Square specified area includes the:

  • access laneway immediately in front of City Hall between Adelaide Street and Ann Street, and
  • footpath areas of these two streets immediately beside City Hall.

Election signs may be placed or erected in the King George Square specified area for the period that pre-polling occurs at City Hall, provided that:

  • election signs do not obstruct pedestrians or traffic, constitute a safety hazard or interfere with public infrastructure
  • no election signs are erected or placed on a median strip or roundabout
  • each registered political party or independent candidate has no more than four election displays in the King George Square specified area
  • other signs advocating for a particular cause or issue may be included in an election display as part of the maximum number of signs, with permission of the custodian
  • a sign advocating for a particular cause or issue is not part of an election display (written approval from Council is required)
  • the maximum number of four election signs displayed per election display
  • a double-sided election sign counts as two signs
  • the maximum size of each election sign is 0.6 square metres
  • the custodian must always be in a position to visibly supervise the election display and remain within the King George Square specified area
  • no election displays are allowed within six metres of the entrance to City Hall
  • if the election sign involves the use of digital media, the sign must only use static images (i.e. no animation or moving pictures)
  • you can erect continuous signage devices provided they are not attached or affixed to any Council infrastructure or asset.

Election sign enforcement

Find out the guidelines for political parties, candidates and elected representatives by downloading:

Last updated:10 July 2019