Protecting biodiversity in Brisbane

Brisbane is Australia's most biodiverse capital city with the highest diversity of native plants and wildlife of any other capital city. Despite more than 100 years of European settlement and being a part of one of the fastest growing regions in Australia, we still have 63 different vegetation communities with over 800 species of wildlife, and over 2500 species of native plants.

Brisbane City Council is committed to protecting, managing and enhancing Brisbane's biodiversity values. The Brisbane Vision includes the aspiration to maintain a clean and green city that continues to support a high level of biodiversity. 

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Wildlife Conservation Partnership Program

Landholders who join Brisbane City Council's Wildlife Conservation Partnership Program receive help and advice on revegetation, local flora and fauna species and how to conserve and restore wildlife habitat on their land.

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Wildlife in Brisbane

Brisbane’s native animals and birds play an important role in our city’s biodiversity and it is an offence to harm them. They help to control pest insects and spread native vegetation. Find out how to live with nuisance wildlife and what you can do to protect our city’s biodiversity.

Brisbane Invasive Species Management Plan

Whether you own a house with a garden in the inner city, suburban acreage or an industrial site, you are responsible for controlling invasive plants and animals on your land. Find out the species and how you can manage them.

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Protected vegetation

Council works with landowners using the Natural Assets Local Law 2003 to help protect our natural assets, including bushland areas, wetlands, waterway corridors and trees in urban areas. Find links to nominating vegetation for protection, permitted activities, how to make an application, penalties, and how to find out if you have protected vegetation on your property.

Wildlife movement solutions

Wildlife movement solutions (WMS) are wildlife-friendly crossing infrastructure installed where roads intersect ecological corridors to facilitate the safe movement of wildlife. Examples of this infrastructure includes fencing, underpasses, overpasses, poles and rope bridges. Find out where these are located in Brisbane.

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Protecting the natural environment

Council works with community groups, residents, businesses, property owners, schools and other organisations to help protect and improve our natural environment. Find out what Council is doing and what you can do to help.

Outdoor Recreation Management Strategy

Council has developed the Outdoor Recreation Management Strategy for Brisbane's Natural Areas 2011-2021. The strategy ensures outdoor recreation activities within Brisbane's natural areas can continue to meet the demands of a growing community while protecting the values of these areas.

Habitat Brisbane

The Habitat Brisbane program helps community groups restore natural habitats in parks, remnant bushland, wetlands and along waterways. View the groups in or near your suburb of Brisbane.

Bushland Preservation Levy

Brisbane residents and businesses contribute to protecting Brisbane's most significant natural assets through payment of the Bushland Preservation Levy in their rates account. The funds are used to protect and enhance Brisbane's natural environment.