How to get planning advice on liquor licence proposals | Brisbane City Council

How to get planning advice on liquor licence proposals

Brisbane City Council has an early planning advice service for customers seeking a long-term liquor licence or permit through the Office of Liquor and Gaming Regulation (OLGR) under the Liquor Act 1992 (the Act). Liquor licence proposals must comply with planning requirements. Information demonstrating compliance will assist OLGR in their assessment and decision making process. This advice will highlight any planning matters that need to be addressed prior to lodging a formal application to OLGR. This fact sheet outlines Council’s planning advice service.

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Long-term liquor licence or permit proposals need to comply with planning requirements

The Queensland Government’s OLGR regulates liquor licences and permits under the Act. In addition to complying with the Act, all associated uses for long-term liquor licences must also comply with planning requirements.

Before you lodge an application for a liquor licence with OLGR, you need to find out that what you are proposing complies with the relevant planning requirements. You will need to provide supporting documentation with your application to OLGR to show the planning requirements have been considered.

How to find out if your proposal complies with relevant planning requirements

To find out if the use of the premises associated with your proposed liquor licence or permit complies with relevant planning requirements, you can complete the Investigation into Liquor Licence Request Online form. Your request will be investigated to determine whether the use of premises, operating hours and proposed licence area complies with Brisbane City Plan 2014 (City Plan) and any previous relevant development approvals and conditions in these approvals.

To support your request to Council, you need to supply the following information:

  • property address
  • existing use and the length of time the existing use has been operating (for example, café in operation since June 2005)
  • proposed use (for example, restaurant)
  • current and proposed hours of operation
  • a plan showing the proposed licence area on the site and details of any proposed building work.

The fee for this service is covered by the RFWI fee as per Council’s annual Development Assessment Fee Schedule. To view the current fee schedule, visit Council's website. You will receive written information within 10 business days of paying the fee.

This advice will highlight any planning matters that would need to be addressed prior to lodging a formal application to OLGR.

For further information on Council’s planning advice service, phone Council on 07 3403 8888 and ask to speak with Council’s Planning Information team.

Formal liquor licence process undertaken by OLGR

When a formal application is lodged to OLGR, some applications must be referred to Council under the Act. This referral process is between OLGR and Council. No Council application or fee is required for this part of the process.

Council then has the opportunity to:

  • comment on the reasonable requirements of the public in the locality
  • object to the grant of the application on the grounds the amenity, quiet or good order of the locality would be lessened.

A fast tracked response will be provided by Council to OLGR if a RFWI has been obtained where no planning issues were identified or if the issues identified have been addressed. This includes a further development approval if required.

More information

For information about a temporary liquor licence for an event, a restricted liquor licence or a liquor licence on Council-owned property, please phone Council’s Business Hotline on 133 BNE (133 263), 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

For general information on liquor licensing, please visit the OLGR website or phone 13 QGOV (13 74 68).

Disclaimer: The content of this document has been developed to provide general planning advice and information on liquor licence proposals under the Liquor Act 1992. Brisbane City Council expressly disclaims all liability for errors and omissions of any kind whatsoever whether negligent or otherwise or for any loss, damage, injury or other consequences that may arise from reliance on this publication.

15 December 2017