Babies, Books and Rhymes with Pam at Mitchelton Library - video transcript

This page is a transcript of the Babies, Books and Rhymes with Pam at Mitchelton Library video on Brisbane City Council's YouTube channel. The video is 12 minutes and 53 seconds long.

Watch other videos on our Brisbane: Better together video hub.

 

>> PAM: Hello everybody, my name’s Pam and I’m here at the Mitchelton Library today. And I have got a session for you and your baby, for when you are feeling a bit wriggly.  We’re going to start with our welcome poem, which many of you will already know.

Here is the land, here is the sky, here are my friends, and here am I.

Wonderful. And now we’ll do one of our welcome songs, which is the 'Hi Hello' song.

[singing]: Hi, hello, and how are you? How are you? How are you?
Hi, hello and how are you? How are you today?

Woo hoo!  And we are also going to do our name song today. So I’m going to start with Ted here, and then I’m going to say "baby is here today", but of course at home you can pop in baby’s name.

And then I’m going to say Pam’s here today, but at home you can pop in whoever you are.  Let’s give that a go.

[singing]: Ted is here today, Ted is here today, let’s all clap our hands, ‘cos Ted is here today.
Baby’s here today, Baby’s here today, let’s all clap our hands, ‘cos Baby’s here today.
Pam is here today, Pam is here today, let’s all clap our hands, ‘cos Pam is here today.

Woo hoo! Ok. And now we’re going to wash our hands.

[singing]: This is the way we wash our hands, wash our hands, wash our hands.
This is the way we wash our hands, to keep our bodies healthy.

Great!  We’re going to start off today with 'Baby put your pants on', which goes to that very old tune of 'Shortening bread'.

I like to think this one is helpful to you as a distraction when you’re trying to do things that baby doesn’t like such as getting dressed or changing a nappy.

So, we’re going to do the first verse with the pants on, and then the next time round we’ll go with the nappies.

And this one works particularly well if baby’s lying down like this, just because you can play with her legs like you would if you were doing pants or nappies.

And it also means baby can see your face which is very important when you are doing the reading or even speaking because that really helps them to learn. Ok.

[singing]: Baby put your pants on, pants on, pants on, baby put your pants on, 1 2 3.

And again.

[singing]: Baby put your pants on, pants on, pants on, baby put your pants on, 1 2 3.
Leg to the left! Leg to the right!
Wriggly and jiggle and pull them up tight.
Leg to the left! Leg to the right!
Wriggly and jiggle and pull them up tight.  

[singing]: Baby put your pants on, pants on, pants on, baby put your pants on, 1 2 3.

Now before we go on to the next verse about nappies, did you notice that I used baby’s left instead of mine? If you can remember to do that, that will help when the time comes to learn left and right.

It’s actually quite hard to do though, so give yourself a break if you don’t remember. OK, back with the nappies.

[singing]: Baby put your nappy on, nappy on, nappy on, baby put your nappy on, 1 2 3.
Baby put your nappy on, nappy on, nappy on, baby put your nappy on, 1 2 3.

[singing]: Leg to the left! Leg to the right!
Wriggly and jiggle and pull them up tight.
Leg to the left! Leg to the right!
Wriggly and jiggle and pull them up tight.

[singing]: Baby put your nappy on, nappy on, nappy on, baby put your nappy on, 1 2 3.

Woo hoo! OK Ted, what’s next? Oh, we’re going to go rowing our boat now.  Now I happen to have a nice version of this in a book, so I’m going to do a few pages from this book.

I’m not going to do all the pages though, which is something that you should feel free to do if you’re doing a book with a baby. They’re often not up for the whole story. Ted, you can’t see! So feel free to skip pages, they won’t know! OK, starting with the normal verse…

[singing]: Row, row, row your boat, gently down the stream.  Merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily, life is but a dream.

Now we’re not doing the crocodile just yet, we’re going to go over and do the koala.

[singing]: Row, row, row your boat, quietly by the shore.  If you see a koala there, don’t forget to snore.

OK, you ready? [snores] Very good.

[singing]: Row, row, row your boat, swiftly down the creek.  If you see a bandicoot, don’t forget to squeak. Squeak!

Now I’m going to miss those few pages like I said. You won’t hear Ted complaining. Now we’re up to the wonderful crocodile verse.

[singing]: Row, row, row your boat, further down the stream.  If you see a crocodile, don’t forget to scream. Argh!

That’s always a fun one. And this book as you can see has Australian animals in it instead of the usual, and it’s called Row row row your boat, and it’s by Matt Shanks if you’re ever looking for it in the library.

And with 'Row row row your boat' you can do the actions in all sorts of ways depending on how baby’s sitting.

If they’re lying down like Ted was before you can row with your arms or you can be a bit rebellious and row with your legs instead.

Or if they’re sitting up you can do this either on the floor or on your knee. And of course when they get bigger, they’ll enjoy doing it properly with you on the floor.

OK, what’s next? Oh, our 'Smooth road, bumpy road'. So, I’m going to have Ted facing me. And this one you can do as quietly or as energetically as baby enjoys, and they’ll probably enjoy it more, as they get older, to be more energetic. But anyway, let’s go.

We’re going on a smooth road, a smooth road, a smooth road. 
A bumpy road, a bumpy road, a bumpy road. 
A rough road, a rough road, a rough road. 
Uh oh, pothole! Woooo!

We’ll do that one again. And you’ll notice that I change the way I speak, depending on whether the road is smooth or rough. A bit of expression always goes down well.

We’re going on a smooth road, a smooth road, a smooth road. 
A bumpy road, a bumpy road, a bumpy road. 
A rough road, a rough road, a rough road. 
Uh oh, pothole! Woooo!

And you can do that with babies lying down as well, just by jiggling them with various degrees of energy. OK Ted what’s next? Ooh, our elevator song.

OK, now I’m going to do this twice, once with Ted going up the floors and coming down, and once with the scarf, because you can do it either way, depending on how up you are for lifting baby up five floors. So, are you going to sit there Ted? Good boy.

[singing]: Let’s go riding on an elevator, elevator, elevator.
Let’s go riding on an elevator, come along with me. 
(Here we go) First floor, second floor, third floor, fourth floor, fifth floor – and, down, down, down, down, down.

We’ll use the scarf this time.

[singing]: Let’s go riding on an elevator, elevator, elevator.
Let’s go riding on an elevator, come along with me. 
(Here we go) First floor, second floor, third floor, fourth floor, fifth floor – and, down, down, down, down, down.

And one of the reasons I like that song, is because it counts from one to five, because it’s surprising how many children’s songs count from five to one, which is all very well when you already know how to count, but it’s a bit confusing when you are little.

Ooh, and now we’re going to do 'Mummy’s little baby loves dancing'. Now you can do this one standing up or sitting down.

If you are standing up, when you get to the turning around bit, you can actually turn around. But you’ll see what I do for turning around when I’m sitting down, it’s just a twist like that.

OK, I don’t think I need my scarf anymore. And again this one has left and right in it so I’m going to do my best to remember to do Ted’s left or right. OK.

[singing]: Mummy’s little baby loves dancing, dancing,
Mummy’s little baby loves turning round.
Mummy’s little baby loves dancing, dancing,
Mummy’s little baby loves to boogie down.

[singing]: Lean to the left, lean to the right, hug that baby nice and tight.
Lean to the left, lean to the right, hug that baby nice and tight.

[singing]: Mummy’s little baby loves dancing, dancing,
Mummy’s little baby loves turning round.
Mummy’s little baby loves dancing, dancing,
Mummy’s little baby loves to boogie down.

Woo hoo! Well done Ted! OK, we are going to finish off with two short rounds of If you’re happy and you know it. We’re going to do the clapping, and then we’re going to wave goodbye. So maybe Ted you could turn around so you can see me, and everybody at home. Let’s give it a go.

[singing]: If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands.
If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands.
If you’re happy and you know it, then you really ought to show it.
If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands.

singing]: If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands.
If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands.
If you’re happy and you know it, then you really ought to show it.
If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands.

Bye everybody, thank you very much for watching today.  See you again.

Last updated:23 June 2020
Topics: library