Toddler Time with Jason and Luke at Indooroopilly Library - video transcript

This page is a video transcript of the Toddler Time with Jason and Luke at Indooroopilly Library video hosted on Brisbane City Council's YouTube channel. This video is 11 minutes and 33 seconds long

Find more Council videos at our Brisbane: Better together video hub.

 

>> JASON: Hi Everybody. My name is Jason. 

>>LUKE: My name is Luke.

>> JASON: And we’re from Indooroopilly Library. So today, we’re going to start with Children’s Acknowledgment to Country. So that starts with…

>>TOGETHER: Here is the land, here is the sky, here are my friends and here am I.

>>JASON: Shall we do that one again?

>>TOGETHER: Here is the land, here is the sky, here are my friends and here am I.

>>LUKE: So, something we’d like everybody to keep in mind today as we’re doing our rhymes and stories and songs is that children learn best from talking, playing and singing with us.

And this can be done at anytime, anywhere – at home, in the park, in the car, all sorts of places and of course here at the library when you come with your children to sing with us.

Of course, you can’t visit the library at the moment so we’re going to do our virtual Toddler Time. So the first song I’d like us to do, Jason, is a familiar tune with familiar actions, but for a lot of people, these might be unfamiliar words. 

We’re going to sing 'Heads and Shoulders Knees and Toes' but in the Yuggera language which is the language of the Yuggera people who have lived around the western area of what is now Brisbane for thousands and thousands of years. Let’s give it a go. 

First, we should probably teach people what the words are. So we’ve got..

>>TOGETHER: Gahm

>>LUKE: Our head

>>TOGETHER: Giga

>>LUKE: Shoulders

>>TOGETHER: Buhn

>>LUKE: Knees, and…

>>TOGETHER: Dinna

>>LUKE: Our toes. And of course for the second verse, we’re not allowed to touch our faces. We’re going to use our bear to demonstrate. We’ve got …

Mil – eyes, binung – ears, dhambur – mouth and muru – nose.

I do apologise if I’m not pronouncing all the words absolutely correctly.  Let’s give it a go.

>>TOGETHER [singing]: Gahm, giga, buhn and dinna, buhn and dinna;
gahm, giga, buhn and dinna, buhn and dinna;
mil, binung, dhambur and muru;
gahm, giga, buhn and dinna, buhn and dinna.

>>LUKE: Very good.  Let’s try it one more time, because as we all know, repetition is a great way to learn new songs and new words. Alright…

>>TOGETHER [singing]: Gahm, giga, buhn and dinna, buhn and dinna;
gahm, giga, buhn and dinna, buhn and dinna;
mil, binung, dhambur and muru;
gahm, giga, buhn and dinna, buhn and dinna.

>>LUKE: Very good! [clapping together]

>>LUKE: I hope you enjoyed that song at home. Um, try it out and ah, we look forward to doing that one with you when we re-open. What would you like to do next Jason?

>>JASON: We can do...would everyone like to do 'Incy Wincy Spider'?

>>LUKE: Certainly. Let’s do 'Incy Wincy Spider'. And one thing to remember with 'Incy Wincy Spider'...It has a lot of really great actions in it and if we include actions with our rhymes and songs, those provide meaning and context to the vocabulary that you’re learning. So let’s give it a go.

>>JASON: Shall we check what’s in the spout? Let’s see what’s in the spout, shall we?

>>TOGETHER [gasping]

>>LUKE [whispering]: It’s a spider!

>>JASON: So we’re going to do now 'Incy Wincy Spider'.

>>LUKE [singing]: Incy Wincy Spider climbed up the..

>>TOGETHER [singing]: … water spout. 
Down came the rain and washed poor Incy out.
Out came the sunshine and dried up all the rain,
so Incy Wincy Spider climbed up the spout again.

>>JASON:  I think there’s a second spider in that spout.

>>LUKE:  Oh, a second spider.

>>JASON:  Shall we help that spider get out of the spout?

>>LUKE: Let’s give it a try.

>>LUKE [singing]: Incy Wincy…

>>TOGETHER [singing]: … Spider climbed up the water spout. 
Down came the rain and washed poor Incy out.
Out came the sunshine and dried up all the rain,
so Incy Wincy Spider climbed up the spout again.

>>LUKE: Wonderful stuff. For our next set of songs, I’m going to use them to help me tell a story.  This story is a Dreamtime story which is thousands and thousands of years old. 

This particular version, ah, is told by the Gunnai Kurnai people of the East Gippsland area of Victoria and if any of you have ever been to the town of Warwick, there’s actually a statue of this fellow: Tiddalik the frog.

So, we’ll do a bit of a short re-telling of this story and we’ll have a couple of songs as well.

So, once upon a time there was a frog called Tiddalik.  Tiddalik was a very, very greedy frog and because he lived in a hot climate, he was a very, very thirsty frog. 

One day, Tiddalik was so thirsty he drank all the water in the billabong, he drank all the water in the creek, he drank all the water from the rivers and all of the ponds and puddles that had formed by the rain until there was no more water left and a very, very fat, waterlogged Tiddalik.

Now of course, all of the other animals that live near-by had no more water to drink, so they all decided to get together and have a parade in front of Tiddalik to try to make him laugh and open his mouth, to get all the water out so that they could have a drink again.

So, for this part, we’re going to sing a song to the tune of 'Frere Jacques', which is 'Barramundi'. The barramundi was the first animal and of course with the rivers and things dried up he was suffering pretty badly by Tiddalik drinking all the water. It starts like this…

>>TOGETHER [singing]: Barramundi, barramundi, cockatoo, cockatoo,
emu and koala, emu and koala,
kangaroo, kangaroo.

>>LUKE: Shall we try that one more time?

>>TOGETHER [singing]: Barramundi, barramundi, cockatoo, cockatoo,
emu and koala, emu and koala,
kangaroo, kangaroo.
[laughing].

>>LUKE: So, look, that made us laugh, Jason, but it didn’t work on Tiddalik. Tiddalik still had his mouth firmly shut and all of the water inside him, until finally the animal that made him laugh was the eel, um, and in the language, the eel was called, Nabunum. The eel. 

So the eel came along, again, a water-dwelling creature who was suffering from not having any water to swim in. And the eel started twisting itself into knots and all sorts of hilarious shapes, which finally made Tiddalik laugh out loud. Laughing out loud!

And all of the water started pouring out from his mouth and filling up the billabongs and streams so that all of the animals could finally have a drink. Look at all the water coming down for the animals to drink from. And that’s the story of Tiddalik the frog.

One of the animals that didn’t get a mention in our story, which is famous for its laugh is the kookaburra.  Would you like to sing ‘Kookaburra Sits In The Old Gum Tree?’

>>TOGETHER [singing]: Kookaburra sits in the old gum tree,
merry, merry king of the bush is he.
Laugh Kookaburra, laugh,
Kookaburra, gay your life must be.

>>LUKE: One more time, do you reckon?

>>JASON: We shall do.

>>TOGETHER [singing]: Kookaburra sits in the old gum tree,
merry, merry king of the bush is he.
Laugh Kookaburra, laugh,
Kookaburra, gay your life must be.

>>LUKE: Well, that is about all the time that we have for today. I think we can do one more song as a farewell. A nice calming song.

>>JASON: And we’re going to do, 'Twinkle Twinkle Little Star'.

>>LUKE: Let’s get our fingers up, remembering our actions.

>>JASON: We’ve got our little star here. So if you don’t have the star at home, you can just use your fingers like that and reach up to the sky. We ready? One, two, three…

>>TOGETHER [singing]: Twinkle twinkle little star,
how I wonder what you are.
Up above the world so high,
like a diamond in the sky.
Twinkle twinkle little star,
how I wonder what you are.

>>LUKE: Alright. Thank you all so much for joining us today as we deliver our virtual online toddler time session. We can’t wait to see you all back in the library as soon as we can.

>> TOGETHER: Bye!

Last updated: 8 June 2020
Topics: library