Streets of Remembrance D-I | Brisbane City Council

Streets of Remembrance D-I

Find a list of streets that have received the ‘Rising Sun’ or ‘Royal Australian Navy’ badge as part of the Streets of Remembrance project. If you would like more information, phone Council on 07 3403 8888 or by email.

For the meaning of abbreviated titles on this page, view a table with abbreviations and meanings

Dalziel

Relevant street

  • Dalziel Street, Enoggera Army Base
  • Dalziel Street, Nundah

Significance

Henry Dalziel (1893-1965) from North Queensland, was a private in the 15th Battalion and was the recipient of the thousandth Victoria Cross awarded and the second of two awarded for the battle of Hamel.

Dalziel served on the Somme, at Pozieres and Mouquet Farm, Bullecourt, Messines and Polygon Wood. During the battle of Hamel, Dalziel and a partner subdued one machine gun post before Dalziel single-handedly captured another. Although his trigger finger was wounded, Dalziel was part of the final assault on Pear Trench. He continued to ferry ammunition to the front line until shot in the head.

Despite severe injuries to his skull, Dalziel survived to return to Australia in 1919 after extensive medical treatment in England.

Dartnell

Relevant street

  • Dartnell Street, Geebung

Significance

Lieutenant William Thomas Dartnell VC was awarded the Victoria Cross for bravery and his ‘gallant attempt to save others’. Born in Melbourne in 1885, Dartnell first enlisted and served in the Second Boer War (1899-1902) at age 16. He returned to Australia and married in 1907 and later settled in South Africa. When the First World War broke out he sailed to England and enlisted in the 25th (Service) Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers (Frontiersmen) in February 1915 using the name Wilbur Taylor Dartnell.

The 25th Battalion of Royal Fusiliers, raised for use against German troops in British East Africa, included men “of various ages and strange experience from all quarters of the globe” and was “the only British unit sent on active service without preliminary training” (wikipedia.org/Wilbur_Dartnell). The Fusiliers reached Mombasa in May 1915 and were posted to protect the Uganda railway from enemy raiding parties. Dartnell was promoted to Lieutenant in July and his company was assigned to Makatau to patrol the frontier. On 3 September 1915 his mounted infantry party was ambushed. Dartnell was wounded in the fighting but refused assistance to evacuate so that the badly wounded could be removed as they faced certain death. He twice ordered his men to abandon him and began firing on the advancing German troops. Dartnell was killed in action but took seven of the enemy with him.

Dartnell was awarded the Victoria Cross posthumously and received the Queen’s South Africa Medal and service medals.

Daw

Relevant streets

  • Daw Road, Runcorn
  • Daw Road, Eight Mile Plains

Significance 

Reginald Daw was 21 years old when he enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) in December 1915. A timber hauler by trade and born in Bristol, England, Daw was the son of Minnie Daw of Sunnybank. Reginald Daw, a private in the 49th Battalion of the AIF, was killed in action in Belgium in June 1917 and is commemorated on the Sunnybank District Honour Roll in the Sunnybank RSL Memorial Hall.

Reginald's brother, Sidney Daw, a poultry farmer, was 18 years and 8 months old when he enlisted in September 1916. Sidney Daw was assigned to the 26th Battalion and embarked from Brisbane aboard the 'Marathon' in October 1916. He disembarked initially at Plymouth in January 1917 and then proceeded to France after completing his training in May. Daw was invalided to hospital in England in March 1918 and returned to Australia aboard the 'Saxon' in December 1918. He was discharged in April 1919.

Delville

Relevant street

  • Delville Avenue, Moorooka

Significance

The Battle of Delville Wood (15 July – 3 September 1916) was one of the bloodiest battles of the Somme with large numbers of casualties for the Allied and German armies during the six weeks of fighting. The South African Brigade joined the British, Canadian and Australian and New Zealand Army Corps troops in sustaining heavy losses as they captured and held Delville Wood which was crucial to maintaining the Allied advance. Delville Wood Cemetery contains 5523 graves including 3593 unknown burials reflecting the length of time that elapsed before the bodies of the fallen could be removed and buried.

Derrer

Relevant street

  • Derrer Street, McDowall

Significance

Mary Jane Derrer was a nurse born in Mackay in 1892 who enlisted in No.2 Australian General Hospital in 1915. She embarked on the Orsova and served in Egypt, France and Belgium. In 1917 Derrer was awarded the Military Medal, one of only seven awarded to Australian nurses, for ‘coolness under fire’. She returned to Australia in December 1917 and left the Australian Army Nursing Service but re-enlisted and sailed to India with the 34th Welsh Hospital and the 18th and 19th British Hospital. Derrer returned to Australia at the end of the war and was discharged in January 1920.

Dickebusch

Relevant street

  • Dickebusch Street, Moorooka

Significance

Dickebusch is a village south-west of Ypres, the site of numerous battles between the Allied and German troops. The Germans invaded Ypres in October 1914 and then the foot soldiers moved towards Dickebusch. Allied troops arrived a few days later and Ypres was a war zone for the next four years. The New Military Cemetery at Dickebusch was established in February 1915 and used by fighting units and field ambulances until 1917. It was extended for further burials in 1918. The cemetery contains 1171 burials, including Australian Imperial Force soldiers. 13 graves are unidentified.

Digger/s

Relevant streets

  • Digger Street, Woolloongabba
  • Diggers Drive, Clayfield

Significance

The term 'digger' has strong associations with Australians and in particular Australian soldiers. There is some debate however about its origins and the timing of its adoption by Australian troops.

One suggested origin is that Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) leader, Lieutenant General William Birdwood, is reported to have warned the soldiers preparing for Gallipoli landings that they had to be good diggers and good soldiers.

An unnamed reporter of the Gallipoli conflict referred to the ANZACs as "the best trench diggers in the (British) Army".

Some argue that 'digger' was first adopted for New Zealand trench diggers (Maori and non-combat troops from Otago) who were responsible for excavating vital communication trenches during the Battle of the Somme (1916).

Research has found that by mid-1917 both Australian and New Zealand soldiers were being referred to as 'diggers' in both personal and official correspondence, suggesting it had been adopted by both sides with pride. 

Dixon

Relevant street

  • Dixon Street, Sunnybank

Significance

Victor Dixon was a labourer aged 25 years and 9 months when he enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force in December 1915. He had a wife, Marle Dixon, and daughter who lived at Sunnybank on the South Coast Line. His wife died during the war and his daughter later went to live with Dixon's mother-in-law, Mrs Minnie Daw of Runcorn.

Victor Dixon embarked from Sydney in May 1916, proceeding straight to France. He was promoted to Lance Corporal in the 41st Battalion in 1917.

In July 1917, his name was included in the 325th list of casualties published in The Courier Mail as wounded in action. Four days later, Victor Dixon was reported as dying from wounds on 27 June 1917. He was buried at Kandahar Farm, two and a quarter miles southwest of Messines.

Mrs Daw, his daughter's guardian, received his effects in 1918 and his Victory Medal in March 1923. Lance Corporal Victor Dixon is commemorated on the Sunnybank District Honour Roll for the Great War 1914-18 in the Sunnybank RSL Memorial Hall.

Dundonald

Relevant street

  • Dundonald Street, Everton Park

Significance

Lieutenant General Douglas McKinnon Bailie Hamilton Cochrane (1852-1935), 12th Earl of Dundonald, KCB, KCVO was a Scottish representative peer and a British Army General. During the Boer War, Dundonald explored ideas of what would eventually become the tank, a mobile machine gun and smoke screens. Dundonald served in the First World War as Chairman of the Admiralty Committee on Smoke Screens in 1915.

Dundonald

Relevant street

  • Dundonald Street, Everton Park

Significance

Lieutenant General Douglas McKinnon Bailie Hamilton Cochrane (1852-1935), 12th Earl of Dundonald, KCB, KCVO was a Scottish representative peer and a British Army General. During the Boer War, Dundonald explored ideas of what would eventually become the tank, a mobile machine gun and smoke screens. Dundonald served in the First World War as Chairman of the Admiralty Committee on Smoke Screens in 1915.

Dunstan

​Relevant street

  • Dunstan Street, Moorooka

Significance

Corporal William Dunstan VC was mentioned in despatches before taking part in the battle at Lone Pine and awarded the Victoria Cross. Dunstan was born in Ballarat Victoria in 1895. He enlisted in June 1915 and joined the 7th Battalion.

On 9 August, Corporal Dunstan was amongst those defending a newly-captured trench at Lone Pine, along with Corporal Alexander Burton and Lieutenant William Tubb. The Turks advanced on the trench launching a counter-attack by using bombs to destroy the sandbag barricade. They were repulsed and the barricade was rebuilt by Tubb, Burton and Dunstan. The barricade was destroyed twice more and twice rebuilt, although Tubb was wounded and Burton killed by a bomb as they reconstructed the parapet. The bomb burst temporarily blinded Dunstan and he was invalided and discharged in February 1916. He promptly rejoined the militia and served in various ranks until he retired as a lieutenant in 1928. Dunstan went on to a successful career in the newspaper industry.

Elliott

Relevant streets

  • Elliott Road, Nudgee
  • Elliott Street, Hawthorne
  • Elliott Street, Kangaroo Point

Significance

Brigadier General Howard Edward 'Pompey' Elliott was a businessman, politician, distinguished Australian soldier and officer who served in the Boer War and the First World War.

Although wounded at Gallipoli in 1915, Elliott returned to lead the 7th Battalion with courage and decisiveness. Four of the seven Victoria Crosses awarded at Lone Pine went to Elliott's battalion. He was promoted to Brigadier General in 1916.

After the war, Elliott was elected to the Senate in 1919 and 1925. He continued working in the legal firm he established in 1907. He was involved in the Returned Sailors and Soldiers Imperial League of Australia, before dying in 1931.

Flanders

Relevant street

  • Flanders Street, Salisbury

Significance

The Battle of Flanders is the name of the battles fought in the Flanders region in northern France and Belgium during the First World War. The region, surrounding the ancient city of Ypres, was strategically important as it was in the path of the German invasion of France and the Belgian coast. The First, Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Battles of Ypres, which were fought between October 1914 and October 1918, resulted in millions of casualties on all sides and the near obliteration of Ypres by artillery fire.

The red poppies which are now synonymous with Remembrance Day and Anzac Day, were among the first plants to regrow on the devastated battlefields. It was the sight of the poppies on the battlefield at Ypres in 1915 which moved Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae to write the poem 'In Flanders Fields'.

Foch

Relevant streets

  • Foch Street, Ashgrove
  • Foch Street, Wynnum West

Significance

French military officer, Ferdinand Foch, became Supreme Commander of the Allied forces in the final months of the First World War and is credited as the leader most responsible for the Allied victory.

Born in 1851, Foch was inspired by the war stories of his grandfather from the Revolution and Napoleonic eras. He fought in the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-71, entered artillery training and later War College and was a Brigadier General by 1908.

In 1913, Foch commanded the Twentieth Army Corps which protected the Lorraine frontier and in 1914 commanded the French Second Army which halted the German advance on Nancy. He went on to command the Ninth Army which stopped the German advance on Paris. He retired in 1916, but was appointed to the Chief of War Minister's general staff and adviser to the Allied armies in 1917, before being appointed Supreme Generalissimo of Allied Forces on the Western Front. In July and August 1918, Foch instigated a series of operations which resulted in the Germans seeking armistice in November 1918. 

Foch played a prominent role in the Treaty of Versailles. After the signing Foch retired from public life.

French

Relevant streets

  • French Street, Coorparoo
  • French Street, Eagle Farm
  • French Street, Everton Park
  • French Street, Paddington
  • French Street, Wynnum

Significance

General John Denton Pinkstone French (1852-1925), Earl of Ypres, KP, GCB, OM, GCVO, KCMG, ADC, PC was born in Kent and joined the Royal Navy before transferring to the British Army in 1874. Following a varied and distinguished career in the Boer War, French was promoted to Field Marshall in 1913. He commanded the British Expeditionary Force in the early part of the First World War. However, his concern for the welfare of his troops came at a cost to their French allies. French was replaced by General Haig and served as Commander of the British Home Forces from 1915-18.

Gaba Tepe

Relevant street

  • Gaba Tepe Street, Moorooka

Significance

Gaba Tepe is the headland south of the landing site of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) on what is now known as Anzac Cove. The troops landed at night but the formations became mingled in the dark and the assault plans had to be discarded. Fragmented companies and battalions were thrown into battle and received mixed orders. Over two thousand ANZACs were killed or wounded on what has become ‘Anzac Day’ – a national day of commemoration and appreciation for Australia’s defence forces.

Gager

Relevant street

  • Gager Street, Sunnybank

Significance

Francis Gager was a farm labourer, aged 19 years 8 months, when he enlisted in the 9th Battalion of the Australian Imperial Force in August 1914. His mother was Bessie Gager of Sunnybank. Having previously trained in the 9th Infantry, but living in an 'exempt area', Private Gager embarked from Australia in September 1914. Gager was wounded in action at Gallipoli in July 1915 and hospitalised before being transferred to Cairo for further treatment. Gager rejoined his unit at Tel-el-Kebir in January 1916. Gager joined the British Expeditionary Force and disembarked to Marseilles in April 1916. He was detached for duty and served in France during 1917 with the 1st Australian Division Salvage Company. After a number of detachments to various Infantry brigades, Gager had 'special leave' to embark for Australia on 13 October 1918 and was discharged in Brisbane in February 1919. 

Private Francis Gager returned to Sunnybank and is commemorated on the Sunnybank District Honour Roll for the Great War 1914-18 in the Sunnybank RSL Memorial Hall.

Gager Street contains the Sunnybank RSL Memorial Hall and is one of the streets named for soldiers in the Model Suburban Settlement for Returned Soldiers, Sunnybank.

Gallipoli

Relevant street

  • Gallipoli Road, Carina Heights

Significance

The Gallipoli campaign, also known as the Dardanelles campaign, the Battle of Gallipoli or the Battle of Çanakkale, was a campaign which occurred on the Gallipoli peninsula between 25 April 1915 and 9 January 1916. The date of the landing, 25 April, is known as 'Anzac Day'.

Gaza

Relevant street

  • Gaza Road, Holland Park West

Significance

The British launched three major battles in 1917 to capture Gaza, a city pivotal to the Turkish defence of Southern Palestine. The first was a bold plan to encircle and capture the town. The Commander of the British forces, General Sir Charles Dobell, however ordered a withdrawal, believing victory was not imminent and supplies would fail. At the same time, the Commander of the Turkish forces, German General Kress von Kressenstein believed Gaza was lost and did not call for reserves. Once Dobell realised his error and again attacked, it was too late and Kressenstein's reinforcements had arrived. For the third battle, the Battle of Beersheba, British Commander Edmund Allenby, amassed sufficient forces for victory. He assembled an attacking force in front of Gaza and began a bombardment, while attacking Beersheba and then Tel es Sheria, effectively splitting the Turkish armies.

Gellibrand

Relevant streets

  • Gellibrand Street, Clayfield
  • Gellibrand Street, Hendra

Significance

On the declaration of World War One, John (Jack) Gellibrand was appointed to the Australian Imperial Force as a Captain. He was made Deputy Assistant Quartermaster General to 1 ANZAC Corps and promoted to Major in September 1914. Gellibrand landed at Anzac Cove with the 1st Division. Gellibrand was wounded a number of times and evacuated, but on his return was promoted to command the 6th Infantry Brigade and fought with them at Pozières and Mouquet Farm in 1916, and Bapaume and the Hindenburg Line in 1917.

Gellibrand was mentioned in dispatches and awarded a Distinguished Service Order (DSO) and while in France was awarded a bar to his DSO. He also received American and French medals.

Geelong

Relevant street

  • Geelong street, East Brisbane

Significance

HMAT Geelong A2 was one of His Majesty's Australian Transports (HMAT) ships.

A fleet of transport ships was leased by the Commonwealth government for the specific purpose of transporting the various Australian Imperial Force formations to their respective overseas destinations. When not committed to military transport, these ships were employed to carry various commodity exports to Britain and France. The fleet was made up from British ships and captured German vessels.

HMAT Geelong A2 weighed 7851 tonnes with an average cruise speed of 12 knots or 22.22 kilometres per hour. It was owned by the P&O Steam Navigation Company, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until it collided with SS Bonvilston in the Mediterranean and sunk on 1 January 1916. 

Gizerah

Relevant street

  • Gizerah Street, Mitchelton

Significance

This street name is a misspelling of Gezirah near Cairo. Here a palace built by the Pasha Ibrahim at the time of the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869 operated as the No.2 Australian General Hospital during World War One. A soldier taken to the hospital wrote - “We are in lovely palaces, five stories high and over 300 rooms. Outside are beautiful trees and flowers, also statues. It is something lovely after being at the Front.” A Sydney doctor reported that they only had one and half days to get ready to receive 250 patients and had “wounded chaps” arriving in the thousands and only one other medical officer to help.

Glasgow

Relevant streets

  • Glasgow Street, Ashgrove
  • Glasgow Street, Zillmere

Significance

Born in 1876 at Tiaro near Maryborough, Sir Thomas William (Bill) Glasgow joined the Queensland Mounted Infantry (QMI) as a teenager and served in the South African War being mentioned in dispatches and awarded the Distinguished Service Order.

When World War One broke out, Glasgow joined the Australian Imperial Force and was appointed Major in the 2nd Light Horse Regiment. His regiment landed at Gallipoli where Glasgow's heroism earned him command of the regiment. On the Western Front, Glasgow led the 13th Infantry Brigade through the famous battles at Pozières, Messines, Passchendaele, Mouquet Farm and Dernancourt. He was promoted to Major General in June 1918 and demobilised in August 1919 having been awarded several French medals and a knighthood.

Goble

Relevant streets

  • Goble Street, Hendra

Significance

Stanley James Goble was born in Croydon, Victoria in 1891. He was accepted as a trainee airman in 1915 with the rank of temporary flight sub-lieutenant in the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS). After completing his training, he was posted to Dover Air Station where he test-flew new aircraft and undertook brief anti-submarine patrols. Goble was also posted to the base at Dunkirk, where he flew a single-seater Sopwith Pup and shot down a German plane in 1916.

Goble was a foundation member of a squadron of experienced pilots formed for the Battle of the Somme and was later promoted and awarded the Croix de Guerre and Distinguished Service Cross. In 1917 he was appointed acting flight commander in France and was awarded the Distinguished Service Order for ‘conspicuous bravery and skill in attacking hostile aircraft on numerous occasions’. By January 1918, Goble was squadron commander committed to bombing naval targets and aerodromes, and later bridges, railway sidings and advancing enemy infantry columns ahead of Allied offensives.

The RNAS merged with the Royal Flying Corps to form the Royal Air Force in April 1918 and Goble was appointed major in the new service. He was appointed M.B.E. in 1917, O.B.E. in 1918 and twice mentioned in dispatches.

Haig

Relevant streets

  • Haig Road, Auchenflower
  • Haig Road, Milton
  • Haig Road, Paddington
  • ​Haig Street, Ashgrove
  • Haig Street, Clayfield
  • Haig Street, Coorparoo
  • Haig Street, Gordon Park
  • Haig Street, Stafford
  • Haig Street, Wynnum West

Significance

Field Marshall Douglas Haig (1861-1928), 1st Earl Haig, KT, GCB, OM, GCVO, KCIE, ADC commanded the 1st Army Corps of the British Expeditionary Force serving under General French in 1914. Firstly known for the Somme Offensive in 1916, Haig is quoted as saying machine guns and tanks were overrated as military weapons. He is credited with masterminding the campaign at Passchendaele in 1917 and overseeing the successful Allied advances on the Western Front in 1918. He later succeeeded French as Commander-in-Chief of the British Home Forces until 1921 and founded the Royal British Legion to care for the welfare of First World War returned soldiers.

Hamel

Relevant streets

  • Hamel Street, Camp Hill
  • Hamel Road, Holland Park West

Significance

Hamel is a township in France on the Somme, near the Villers-Bretonneau plateau and Amiens. The battle for Allied control of the township was planned by Lieutenant General John Monash and Brigadier Thomas Blamey. On 4 July 1918, the co-ordination of infantry, artillery, armour and aircraft resulted in the capture of German positions and 1000 prisoners by two Australian infantry brigades, assisted by American troops, British Tanks and air drops of supplies and ammunition. It was a decisive victory which helped turn the tide of the war.

Hamilton

Relevant street

  • Hamilton Road, Moorooka*

Significance

Lieutenant John Patrick Hamilton VC was born in Orange, NSW in 1896 and enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force in September 1914. After training in Egypt with the 3rd Battalion, Hamilton took part in the Gallipoli landing on 25 April 1915.

On 9 August during the battle of Lone Pine, Hamilton displayed enormous courage in leaving the trenches to lie in the open to fire on the advancing Turks. For six hours Hamilton lay in the face of intense enemy fire, with utter disregard for his personal safety, protected by only a few sandbags. With coolness and daring, Hamilton instructed those in the trenches on where to throw bombs and his example inspired the defence and resulted in the enemy being driven off with heavy losses. Hamilton’s courageous feat earned him the only Victoria Cross awarded to his unit.

*Close to Blackburn Street – Hamilton Roads in other suburbs predate 1916.

Heilly

Relevant street

  • Heilly Street, Moorooka

Significance

Heilly Casualty Clearing Station (CCS) was established in April 1916 as part of the evacuation chain for wounded soldiers. Further from the front line than Aid Posts and Field Ambulances, the CCS applied enough treatment for soldiers to either return to duty or be safely evacuated to a base hospital. Generally located near railway lines, the positions of clearing stations are often marked by surrounding cemeteries. Heilly Cemetery contains the graves of 2890 Commonwealth servicemen, 12 of whom are unidentified.

Heliopolis

Relevant street

  • Heliopolis Parade, Mitchelton

Significance

The 1st Australian General Hospital was located in a repurposed Palace Hotel in Heliopolis, about seven kilometres west of Cairo. This hospital dealt with physical injuries, diseases and shell shock. It was also a compound for Australian Light Horse regiments before they were shipped to Gallipoli.

Helles

Relevant streets

  • Helles Road, Enoggera
  • Helles Street, Moorooka

Significance

Cape Helles on the Gallipoli peninsula was the site of a landing by British and French troops on 25 April 1915. The British landing was mismanaged resulting in a bloodbath, with the planned advance to capture forts guarding the straits of the Dardanelles abandoned.

Hobbs 

Relevant street

  • Hobbs Street, Auchenflower

Significance

Lieutenant General Sir Joseph John Talbot Hobbs (1864-1938) KCB, KCMG, VD was a Perth Architect who joined the volunteer artillery in 1893. From that time, he rose rapidly through the ranks to be a full Colonel commanding the 22nd infantry brigade by 1913, before becoming Aide-De-Camp to the Governor General from 1908-17. In 1914, Hobbs commanded the 1st Australian Divisional Artillery and fought at Gallipoli until struck down by dysentery in 1915. On recovery, he went to France and commanded the Australian artillery at Pozieres in 1916. Hobbs was made Major General in 1917 and commanded the Australian 5th Division with distinction at Polygon Wood. He was knighted in 1918 and again in 1919. Hobbs was also awarded the Serbian Order of the White Eagle in 1917, the French Croix de Guerre twice and was mentioned in dispatches eight times.

Howell

Relevant street

  • Howell Street, Kedron

Significance

This street was known as Alfred Street until Brisbane City Council decided to eliminate the duplication of street names in 1938. Some replacement names in the northern area of Brisbane were chosen to honour winners of the Victoria Cross.

George Julian Howell (1893-1964) was a builder in Sydney when he enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force in June 1915. He served at Gallipoli until the evacuation and went with his battalion to France in 1916 where he was wounded at Pozieres. He returned and lead a rifle bombing section in the capture of Demicourt in 1917. For this he was awarded the Military Medal for courage and devotion to duty. A month later near Bullecourt he climbed onto a parapet and bombed the enemy who were invading the trenches, using his bayonet when he ran out of bombs. His 'prompt and gallant conduct' inspired the battalion to successfully counter-attack and earned Howell the Victoria Cross. The machine gun wounds to his legs and multiple injuries he suffered during his actions, led to hospitalisation in England before his demobilsation in June 1918. Corporal George Julian 'Snowy' Howell also served in World War Two.

Hunter

Relevant streets

  • Hunter Close, Calamvale
  • Hunter Lane, Bald Hills
  • Hunter Lane, Clayfield
  • Hunter Street, Albion
  • Hunter Street, Everton Park
  • Hunter Street, Greenslopes
  • Hunter Street, Indooroopilly
  • Hunter Street, Kelvin Grove
  • Hunter Street, Manly West
  • Hunter Street, Norman Park

Significance

General Sir Archibald Hunter GCB, GCVO, DSO, TD (1856-1936) was a General in the British Army who first distinguished himself during the Boer War where he worked alongside Kitchener. From 1910-13, he was Governor of Gibraltar and in 1914 became the General Officer commanding 13th (Western) Division. He served in the First World War as Commander of the 3rd Army and was then made General Officer, Commanding Aldershot Training Centre and later Aldershot Command. He retired in 1918.

Imbros

Relevant streets

  • Imbros Street, Enoggera
  • Imbros Street, Nundah

Significance

Imbros or Imroz, officiallly change to Gokceada since 29 July 1970, is the largest island of Turkey.

In 1915, Imbros played an important role as a staging post for the allied Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, prior to and during the invasion of the Gallipoli peninsula. A field hospital, airfield and administrative and store buildings were constructed on the island. Many Australian and New Zealand Army Corp (ANZAC) soldiers were based at Imbros during the Gallipoli campaign and the island was used as an air and naval base by ANZAC, English and French forces against Turkey.

On 20 January 1918, a naval action took place in the Aegean, near the island where an Ottoman squadron engaged a flotilla of the the British Royal Navy.

Inwood

Relevant street

  • Inwood Street, Wooloowin

Significance 

This street was known as James Street until Brisbane City Council decided to eliminate the duplication of street names in 1938. Some replacement names in north Brisbane were chosen to honour winners of the Victoria Cross.

Reginald Roy Inwood (1890-1971) was a miner at Broken Hill when he enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force in August 1914. Inwood served at Gallipoli until November 1915 and went with his battalion, which included his brother, to France in 1916. His brother was killed at Pozieres. In September 1917 at Polygon Wood on Menin Road, Inwood ran through the Allied barrage and captured an enemy strong post, killing several soldiers and capturing nine. He volunteered for a night-long patrol, sending back valuable information. On 21 September, Inwood, and briefly another soldier, located and bombed a machine gun post, killing the crew and capturing one survivor and the gun. Inwood was awarded the Victoria Cross for 'most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty' in 1917.

He was promoted to Corporal and later Sergeant with the 10th Battalion until May 1918. He returned to Broken Hill a hero, which contrasted with the jeering and hooting from militant socialists which he and departing recruits had endured.

Table of abbreviations and titles

Abbreviation Meaning
ADC Aide-de-Camp
DSO Companion of the Distinguished Service Order
GCB Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath
GCVO Knight Grand Cross of Royal Victorian Order
KCB Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath
KCIE Knight Commander of the Order of the Indian Empire
KCMG Knights Commander of the Order of St Michael and St George
KCVO Knight Commander of the Royal Victorian Order
KP Knight of St Patrick
KT Knight of the Thistle
OM Order of Merit
PC Privvy Counsellor
TD Territorial Decoration
VC Victoria Cross
VD Volunteer Officers' Decoration

 

09 November 2018