Streets of Remembrance J-P | Brisbane City Council

Streets of Remembrance J-P

Find the streets that have received the Rising Sun or Royal Australian Navy badge as part of the Streets of Remembrance project. If you would like more information, contact Council on 07 3403 8888 or by email.

For the meaning of abbreviated titles on this page, view a table with abbreviations and meanings.

Jackson

Relevant streets

  • Jackson Road, Acacia Ridge
  • Jackson Road, Sunnybank Hills
  • Jackson Street, Clayfield
  • Jackson Street, Coorparoo
  • Jackson Street, Indooroopilly

Significance

Private John William ('Billy') Jackson VC was awarded the Victoria Cross for his conspicuous gallantry in assisting wounded comrades to safety under heavy fire, despite his own severe injuries. Born in Gunbar NSW in 1897, Jackson enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force in early 1915, although he was underage. Assigned to the 17th Battalion, he trained in Egypt before landing at Gallipoli on 20 August 1915. He immediately joined the fighting at Hill 60. Jackson was later evacuated with dysentery and typhoid, but rejoined his unit in March 1916.

The division was immediately sent to the Western Front where Jackson volunteered for an operation conducting raids on enemy trenches. On 25 June 1916, Jackson was a member of a scouting party which advanced under heavy fire to neutralise enemy listening posts and raid enemy trenches. The party withdrew under heavy shelling and Jackson brought a prisoner back and returned for a wounded comrade. He went back for another man and was returning when his right arm was shattered by an explosion. Ignoring his own condition, Jackson returned to get help to recover the wounded. Receiving only rudimentary first aid for his arm that was later amputated, Jackson continued to help wounded soldiers until all were recovered.

For his heroic compassion Jackson was at first awarded a Distinguished Conduct Medal. This was cancelled in favour of the highest award, the Victoria Cross (VC). Jackson became Australia's youngest VC winner at age 18 as well as the recipient of the first Australian VC awarded on the Western Front. However, the Commonwealth Gazette No.184 of December 1916 announced the award of both medals, heralding years of confusion.

Jeays

Relevant street

  • Jeays Street, Sandgate

Significance

Albert Frederick Jeays was a clerk, one month off turning 22 years old, when he enlisted in the 9th Infantry Battalion of the Australian Imperial Force in August 1914. His mother, Mrs J. Jeays, lived in Wharf Terrace, Sandgate.

After 10 weeks in the trenches at Gallipoli, on 28 June 1916 Jeays was hit by a bomb which severely wounded his left leg. He was transported to a hospital ship where his leg was amputated. The stump went septic and he was sent to a London hospital. The wound healed and Jeays was invalided out of the war, aged 23, in November 1915. He returned to Australia aboard the HMAT Themistocles in June 1916. Over 50 years later, Jeays received the Gallipoli Commemorative Medallion.

Private Albert Frederick Jeays is commemorated on the Sandgate School of Arts Roll of Honour and the Sandgate War Memorial.

Arthur Vivian Jeays also enlisted in August 1914, aged 27 years 4 months. Arthur was an ironmonger and the son of Mrs Mary Ann Jeays of 'Seamount' at Shorncliffe.

He embarked from Brisbane aboard the HMAT Seang Bee in October 1915 and attached to the 1st Australian Division Headquaters from the 9th Battalion for traffic duties. He returned to the 9th Battalion and in December 1916 was sent from France to the hospital with 'trench feet' This painful debilitating condition, caused by cold, wet, unsanitary conditions, often resulted in gangrene and amputation. Jeays recovered and marched to Havre, France to rejoin this battalion in July 1917. He was promoted to Lance Corporal in February 1918. In July he was wounded in the thigh and right foot and invalided to the United Kingdom. Jeays returned to Australia aboard the HMAT Ceramic in February 1919.

Jellicoe

Relevant streets 

  • Jellicoe Street, Coorparoo
  • Jellicoe Street, Manly West

Significance

Sir John Rushworth Jellicoe (1859-1935), 1st Earl Jellicoe, GCB, OM, GCVO, SGM, DL was Britain's best-known Admiral at the start of World War One. Born on 5 December 1859 in Southhampton, England he joined the Royal Navy in 1872 and served in the Egyptian War of 1882. He then went on to serve as Director of Naval Ordnance from 1905-07 and Controller of the Navy from 1908-10.

Jellicoe was second-in-command of the Grand Fleet in November 1911, appointed as its Commander on 4 August 1914 and subsequently First Sea Lord towards the close of 1916. Jellicoe retired from active service and was made Viscount in 1918. He was promoted to Admiral of the Fleet in 1919 and appointed to the post of Governor General of New Zealand after World War One from 1920-24.

Joffre

Relevant streets

  • Joffre Street, Ashgrove
  • Joffre Street, Coorparoo
  • Joffre Street, Wynnum
  • Joffre Place, Forest Lake

​Significance 

Marshall Joseph Jacques Cesaire Joffre, GCB, OM, GCVO (1852-1931) was a French General who served as Commander-in-Chief of French forces on the Western Front from the start of World War One until the end of 1916. 'Papa Joffre's' calmness and refusal to admit defeat saw him credited with regrouping the retreating allied armies leading to defeating the Germans at the First Battle of the Marne in 1914. Following his dismissal for battle defeats, Joffre served as the head of the French military mission to the United States and President of the Supreme War Council in 1918 before retiring from public life.

Joynt

Relevant streets

  • Joynt Street, Hamilton

​Significance 

William Joynt (1889-1986) rejoined the 8th Battalion as a lieutenant after being shot in Ypres in Belgium in 1916. On the Somme in 1918, Joynt led troops to clear Plateau Wood near Herleville, where enemy fire had halted the attack with heavy losses. Joynt was awarded the Victoria Cross in 1918 for “conspicuous bravery”, (London Gazette, 11 July 1918, page 14040) in leading a bayonet charge and capturing over 80 prisoners.

Kitchener

Relevant streets

  • Kitchener Road, Ascot
  • Kitchener Road, Hendra
  • Kitchener Road, Kedron
  • Kitchener Road, Stafford Heights
  • Kitchener Street, Coorparoo
  • Kitchener Street, Sherwood
  • Kitchener Street, Wynnum

Significance

British Army Officer Lord Kitchener was made Secretary of State for War in 1914. He is credited with foreseeing that the war would not be quickly resolved and that large numbers of fighting men backed by weapons and ammunition would be required for years. An advocate of conscription, Lord Kitchener is the face on the well-known posters exhorting men to “Join Your Country's Army” and “Your Country Wants You”.

In 1915 Kitchener visited Gallipoli to assess the situation and soon recommended that the troops at Anzac Cove, Suvla and Helles, be evacuated. Lord Kitchener died in June 1916, along with 600 others. Kitchener was on his way to encourage continued Russian resistance to the Germans, when the HMS Hampshire struck a German mine off the Orkneys and sank.

Leak

Relevant street

  • Leak Street, Enoggera (army barracks)

Significance

Private John Leak VC (1892-1972) was awarded Queensland’s first Victoria Cross for ‘conspicuous bravery’ in 1916. While records relating to his background are sparse, John Leak’s heroic actions at Pozieres, France on 23 July 1916 were critical to weakening the enemy’s defences and the capture of a German strong-point. John Leak was probably born in Portsmouth, England in 1892, but enlisted as a private in the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) in Rockhampton in 1915. Formerly a teamster, Leak embarked with the 5th Reinforcements for the 9th Battalion, arriving at Gallipoli on 22 June 1915. In 1916 the battalion was posted to the Somme. The village of Pozières, located on a ridge overlooking the Somme, was a vital objective in the Allied advance.

On 22 July, the 1st Australian Division, spearheaded by the 9th Battalion, advanced on Pozières but was stalled by German post with superior weaponry. A party of soldiers, which included John Leak, was ordered to capture the post. With German ‘egg’ bombs outranging Allied grenades, Leak dashed from cover and ran towards the enemy post under heavy fire, hurling grenades. On reaching the trench he leapt in and bayonetted surviving soldiers. While the party was later driven back, Leak was always last to retreat covering his companions by hurling bombs at the enemy. By the time reinforcements arrived, Leak’s courage and energy had weakened the defence and the post was retaken.

Leak was wounded on 21 August at Mouquet Farm and rejoined the battalion in 1917. In March 1918 he was severely gassed at Hollebeke, Belgium and was unable to resume duty until 26 June. When the war ended he was discharged and married Beatrice Chapman in Wales 1918. In February 1919 Leak embarked for Australia but his wife did not join him. He was discharged from the AIF on 31 May 1919 and remained in Australia; remarrying in 1927. He died at Redwood Park, South Australia on 20 October 1972.

Lemnos

Relevant streets

  • Lemnos Street, Nundah/Wavell Heights
  • Lemnos Street, Red Hill

Significance

The 3rd Australian General Hospital was established on the Greek island of Lemnos in the Aegean Sea during August 1915. About 130 nurses served at the hospitals on the island. Many nurses also served on the hospital ships that passed through Lemnos to evacuate wounded from the Gallipoli Peninsula.

Lone Pine

Relevant streets

  • Lone Pine Street, Enoggera

Significance

One of the most famous assaults of the Gallipoli campaign, the Battle of Lone Pine, was originally intended as a diversion from attempts by Australian and New Zealand units to force a breakout from the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps perimeter on the heights of Chunuk Bair and Hill 971. The Lone Pine attack, launched by the 1st Brigade Australian Imperial Force in the late afternoon of 6 August 1915, pitched Australian forces against entrenched Turkish positions. Lone Pine is the site of the annual Australian Anzac Day dawn service at Gallipoli.

Longueval

Relevant street

  • Longueval Street, Moorooka

Significance

Longueval is a village on the Somme and the scene of furious fighting in July 1916 and later in 1918 between the Allies and the Germans. Longueval Road Cemetery, containing 222 graves and commemorations of World War One, was established in 1915 near a dressing (first aid) station known as Longueval Alley. A New Zealand National Memorial marks the position reached by the New Zealand Division in the First Battle of the Somme.

Lonsdale 

Relevant street

  • Lonsdale Street, Ascot

Significance

Lonsdale Cemetery is a World War One Commonwealth cemetery located in the Somme region of France. On the first day of the Battle of the Somme in July 1916, Allied troops, including the 11th (Lonsdale) Battalion attacked the German line here. In 1917, after the German withdrawal, the battlefield was cleared and a cemetery established. It was extended after the Armistice and contains 1542 Commonwealth burials, with 816 unidentified graves.

Lowerson

Relevant street

  • Lowerson Street, Lutwyche

Significance

Albert (Alby) Lowerson (1896-1945) was a sergeant in 21st Battalion in 1918, having been wounded at Mouqet Farm in 1916 and Bullecourt in 1917. Lowerson was awarded the Victoria Cross for his leadership and courage in the capture of Mont St Quentin. His effective bombing tactics enabled his troops to overrun 12 machine gun posts and capture 30 prisoners. Despite being wounded, Lowerson remained with his troops for two days until their position was consolidated. He received his Victoria Cross from King George V in 1919.

Mactier

Relevant street

  • Mactier Street, Fig Tree Pocket

Significance

Robert Mactier (1890-1918) enlisted in 1917 and served in the 23rd Battalion. Mactier was awarded the Victoria Cross posthumously in 1918 for his actions in single-handedly attacking and capturing three enemy machine gun posts, which had halted the Allied advance in the assault on the German stronghold of Mont St Quentin.

As his company’s runner, Mactier was sent to investigate the enemy machine gun positions. He went on to bomb and kill the garrisons while one surrendered, allowing the guns to be captured and disabled. Rushing to attack a fourth position, Mactier was shot and killed. Mactier’s Victoria Cross recognised his valour and determination, with the London Times praising him as a “fine type of wiry Colonial”.

Mametz

Relevant street

  • Mametz Street, Moorooka

Significance

Mametz is a village on the Somme, not far from Delville Wood. While the Allies secured the village on the first day of the Battle of the Somme, the Battle of the nearby Mametz Wood raged for five days leaving over 400 casualties on the first day alone. A cemetery was established and the area used by field ambulances and fighting units. Australian artillery and infantry troops based at Mametz from late 1916 lived in muddy, then freezing conditions in between fighting in the trenches. The German army regained Mametz in March 1918 before being defeated by the Allies in August and September 1918. Local cemeteries, Danzig Valley British Cemetery (1,535 burials), Flatiron Copse Cemetery (1152 burials), Devonshire Cemetery (163 burials) and Gordon Cemetery (102 burials) contain the fallen combatants, with a number remaining unidentified.

Marathon

Relevant street

  • Marathon Street, Aspley

Significance

HMAT A74 Marathon was one of His Majesty's Australian Transports (HMAT) ships.

A fleet of transport ships was leased by the Commonwealth government for the specific purpose of transporting the various Australian Imperial Force formations to their respective overseas destinations. When not committed to military transport, these ships were employed to carry various commodity exports to Britain and France. The fleet was made up from British ships and captured German vessels.

HMAT A74 Marathon weighed 7827 tonnes with an average cruise speed of 16 knots or 30 kilometres per hour. It was owned by the G. Thompson & Co. Ltd, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 28 July 1917.

Margaret

Relevant street

  • Margaret Street, McDowall

Significance

Margaret Street is named for Grace Margaret Wilson, a nursing sister and army matron-in-chief, born in South Brisbane in 1879. After general training in the Brisbane Hospital and working at the Albany Memorial Hospital and as a midwife in London, Wilson became a matron of Brisbane Hospital in 1914.

Wilson enlisted and was appointed principal matron of the 1st Military District. In 1915 she transferred to the A.I.F. as principal matron of the 3rd Australian General Hospital and embarked for England. The hospital was transferred to Lemnos, Greece to treat ANZAC casualties, and despite primitive conditions, Wilson and the nurses kept the mortality rate low. In 1916 the hospital transferred to Abbassia, Egypt where Wilson was mentioned in dispatches three times and awarded the Royal Red Cross, 1st class. The hospital moved again to Brighton, England, then Abbeville, France where Wilson was again mentioned in dispatches and appointed C.B.E on 1 January 1919.

Wilson returned to Queensland in January 1920 with her A.I.F appointment ended in April that year. Wilson became matron-in-chief of the army nursing reserve in 1925 and was awarded the Florence Nightingale Medal in 1929. Grace Margaret Wilson also served in World War Two and was a life member of the Australian Trained Nurses’ Association.

Marne

Relevant street

  • Marne Street, Alderley
  • Marne Road, Albion

Significance

Marne is a river in France, south-east of Paris. In September 1914, it was the site of a Franco-British victory against the Germans, halting their advance into Paris. The battle saw the use of trench warfare for the first time and the use of radio intercepts and automotive transportation of troops.

The second battle of the Marne in July – August 1918 was the last major German offensive on the Western Front during World War One. The assault to capture Paris was halted by French, British Commonwealth and American troops. The counter-attack forced the Germans back beyond their starting point, but at a cost of over 120,000 Allied casualties.

Mashobra

Relevant street

  • Mashobra Street, Mitchelton

Significance

HMAT A47 Mashobra was one of the many troop transport ships which transported Australian troops and equipment to the war zone in the Middle East. Owned by the British-India Steam Navigation Company, the ship was leased by the Commonwealth until 21 December 1916. In 1915, it embarked the 10th Light Horse Regiment Headquarters, Machine Gun Section, ‘A’ and ‘B’ Squadrons and 1st Light Horse Regiment, 11th Reinforcement and Medical Officers. HMAT Mashobra was torpedoed and sunk in the Mediterranean, south-west of Cape Matapan, on 15 April 1917.

McCullough

Relevant streets

  • McCullough Street, Macgregor
  • McCullough Street, Robertson
  • McCullough Street, Sunnybank

Significance

J. McCullough and G. McCullough were two of the 25 members of the Sunnybank District whose names were recorded in gold on a silky oak Honour Board erected at the local railway station in 1916.

No records of the service of R.G.D. McCullough have been found to date,  although the Sunnybank District Honour Roll records that he was killed in action.

J. McCullough, G. McCullough and R.G.D. McCullough are commemorated on the Sunnybank District Honour Roll for the Great War 1914-18 in the Sunnybank RSL Memorial Hall.

W. McCullough was an early landowner in Sunnybank, owning 35 acres adjacent to where the present McCullough Street joins Troughton Road.

Menin

Relevant street

  • Menin Road, Corinda

Significance

The Battle of Menin Road or Menin Road Ridge (20-25 September 1917) was part of the Third Battle of Ypres (Passchendaele). Following previous failures, General Plumer was given permission to devise an alternative strategy. This utilised his 'creeping barrage' approach to attack and secured smaller sections of front line. In a 'leap frog' approach, the troops would stop and regroup to hold their position, while fresher troops continued the advance. Despite the loss of 50,000 soldiers, including 5000 Australians, the tactics were successful and German counterattacks failed.

The Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, which was erected in 1927 in Ypres, Belgium, was proclaimed to be "no invitation to the martial ardour...[but] a mute witness to the awful cost of war".

Messines Ridge

Relevant streets

  • Messines Ridge Road, Holland Park West
  • Messines Ridge Road, Tarragindi

Significance

The Battle of Messines (7-14 June 1917) was a British Army offensive intended to

  • force the Germans to move reserve troops to Flanders from the Arras and Aisne front
  • relieve pressure on French troops
  • capture German defences on the ridge and deprive them of the high ground south of the city of Ypres, which was held by the British.

In the months leading to the attack, the British Second Army led by General Plumer plotted German artillery positions using artillery bombardments, gun calibration and new accurate maps. Tunnelling companies of the Royal Engineers, as well as Canadian, Australian, British and New Zealand miners dug mine chambers and galleries close to, and beneath, enemy lines. The battle began with the simultaneous explosion of a series of mines under the German front line creating 19 huge craters. The soldiers left their trenches and advanced under a barrage of artillery and bombs. As the soldiers advanced, the creeping and standing barrage also advanced according to a timetable designed to mimic the soldiers' progress.

Monash

Relevant streets

  • Monash Court, Forest Lake
  • Monash Place, Ferny Grove​
  • Monash Place, Fitzgibbon​
  • Monash Road, Tarragindi.

Significance

General Sir John Monash was an Australian military Commander during World War One. By 1914, he was in command of the 4th Brigade Australian Imperial Force in Egypt, which he then led in the Gallipoli campaign. In May 1918, he became Commander of the Australian Corps and was later knighted by King George V in August of 1918.

Mons

Relevant streets

  • Mons Road, Carina Heights.

Significance

The Battle of Mons on 23 August 1914 was the opening battle of World War One, where the British Expeditionary Force attempted to hold the Mons-Conde Canal in Belgium against the advancing German First Army. The greater numbers of German troops forced the retreat of the French and British to avoid encirclement, leaving the canal in German hands. 'Imperial Reservists' fought with the British – fellow countrymen who had migrated to Australia and returned to their units at the start of the war. A number of Australian-born men also travelled to England to join the British Army. A legendary ‘Angel of Mons’ is reputed to have appeared in the sky over the British retreat and is depicted on a number of memorials.

Murray

Relevant street

  • Murray Avenue, Enoggera

Significance

Henry William Murray 'Mad Harry' VC, CMG, DSO and Bar, DCM, C de G, is considered to be the most highly decorated infantry soldier of the British Empire of the First World War. He enlisted at age 33 in October 1914 in Western Australia. A self-described 'bushman', Murray joined the 16th Battalion Australian Imperial Force as a machine-gunner and landed at Gallipoli on 25 April 1915.

Murray and his mate, although wounded, refused to leave their posts in the week of heavy fighting following the landing and was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal (DCM) as a result. He was evacuated but re-joined his unit and was transferred to the Western Front, where he earned the Distinguished Service Order (DSO) at the Battle of the Somme. Here, Murray, now a Captain, and his men captured Mouqet Farm, repelling German counter-attacks despite being twice-wounded. In 1917, Murray led his company to capture Stormy Trench, near Gueudecourt. Despite fierce enemy counter-attacks, Murray's tactics, courage and initiative held the position until relief arrived. This feat earned 'Harry' Murray the Victoria Cross. Later in the first battle of Bullecourt, Murray's courageous leadership earned a Bar to his DSO. He was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel in May 1918, commanding the 4th Machine-Gun Battalion. Between 1917-19, Murray was mentioned in dispatches four times and was awarded the French Croix de Guerre and appointed Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George (CMG) in early 1919.

Murray also served in World War Two, commanding the 26th Battalion until 1942, when he became Lieutenant-Colonel of the local North Queensland Battalion of the Volunteer Defence Corps. Murray retired in 1944 and died in 1966, being remembered as a man of unconscious modesty whose courage and leadership was not reckless, but disciplined and charismatic.

Nieppe

Relevant street

  • Nieppe Street, Kedron

Significance

The village of Nieppe in France, near Armentieres, was an Allied base for most of the war. In 1917, Australian troops departed from Nieppe, to fight the Germans near Messines about a 10 kilometre march away. Due to the atrocious conditions, they arrived only 10 minutes before the battle started.

Many soldiers returned to Nieppe as casualties, and were treated, sent to England for hospitalisation, or buried. More casualties occurred in 1918 when the Germans overran the village, before it was reclaimed by British and Australian troops in July 1918.

The Pont-D'Achelles Military Cemetery in Nieppe contains 293 Commonwealth and 37 German burials from World War One. Nieppe Communal Cemetery contains 62 Commonwealth burials - 43 from the United Kingdom, six from Australia, 11 from New Zealand and two from South Africa.

Orontes

​Relevant street

  • Orontes Street, Yeronga

Significance

RMS Orontes was one of His Majesty's Australian Transports (HMAT) ships

A fleet of transport ships was leased by the Commonwealth government for the specific purpose of transporting the various Australian Imperial Force formations to their respective overseas destinations. When not committed to military transport, these ships were employed to carry various commodity exports to Britain and France. The fleet was made up from British ships and captured German vessels.

RMS Orontes weighed 9028 tonnes with an average cruise speed of 18 knots or 33 kilometres per hour. It was owned by the P&O Steam Navigation Company, London. 

Orsova

Relevant streets

  • Orsova Street, Pinkenba

Significance 

HMAT A67 Orsova was one of His Majesty's Australian Transports (HMAT) ships.

A fleet of transport ships was leased by the Commonwealth government for the specific purpose of transporting the various Australian Imperial Force formations to their respective overseas destinations. When not committed to military transport, these ships were employed to carry various commodity exports to Britain and France. The fleet was made up from British ships and captured German vessels.

HMAT A67 Orsova weighed 12,036 tonnes with an average cruise speed of 18 knots or 33 kilometres per hour. It was owned by the Orient Steam Navigation Company, London, and leased by the Commonwealth until 28 February 1917. 

Orvieto

Relevant street

  • Orvieto Street, Yeronga

Significance

HMAT A3 Orvieto was one of His Majesty's Australian Transports (HMAT) ships.

A fleet of transport ships was leased by the Commonwealth government for the specific purpose of transporting the various Australian Imperial Force (AIF) formations to their respective overseas destinations. When not committed to military transport, these ships were employed to carry various commodity exports to Britain and France. The fleet was made up from British ships and captured German vessels.

The Orvieto weighed 12,130 tonnes, with an average cruise speed of 15 knots or 28 kilometres per hour. It was owned by the Orient Steam Navigation Company, London and leased by the Commonwealth until 29 December 1914. It formed part of the first convoy of the AIF to Egypt. The Orvieto became well known for its work during this convoy as it transported the prisoners captured from the beached German raider, SMS Emden. The German prisoners were taken to Egypt by the Orvieto for imprisonment.

Osterley

​Relevant streets

  • Osterley Road, Carina Heights
  • Osterley Road, Yeronga

Significance

RMS Osterley was one of His Majesty's Australian Transports (HMAT) ships.

A fleet of transport ships was leased by the Commonwealth government for the specific purpose of transporting the various Australian Imperial Force formations to their respective overseas destinations. When not committed to military transport, these ships were employed to carry various commodity exports to Britain and France. The fleet was made up from British ships and captured German vessels.

RMS Osterley weighed 12,129 tonnes with an average cruise speed of 18 knots or 33 kilometres per hour. It was owned by the P&O Steam Navigation Company, London.

Passchendaele

Relevant street

  • Passchendaele Street, Tarragindi

Significance

The Battle of Passchendaele is officially known as the Third Battle of Ypres, but has become commonly known by the name of the town that was its final objective.

The Australian Infantry joined the Battle at Menin Road in September 1917. The 1st and 2nd Divisions, relieved a week later by the 4th and 5th Divisions, advanced side-by-side to capture Polygon Woods, near Zonnebecke. However, the cost was huge with 11,000 casualties in six days. The 1st, 2nd and 3rd Divisions captured Broodseinde Ridge in a vital victory on 4 October 1917.

General Haig's plans to capture Passchendaele with combined Allied forces derailed as artillery, tanks, men and horses became stuck in mud and made little progress while under German attacks. 

The capture of Passchendaele was a milestone in the prelude to the planned Flanders offensive.

Peronne

Relevant street

  • Peronne Road, Tarragindi

Significance

Peronne is a town in France and the site of an action regarded as one of the finest Australian feats on the Western Front. Outnumbered by the Germans, Australian soldiers were initially unable to hold Mont St Quentin. However, with reinforcements, Australian soldiers recaptured it the next day and went on to take the town of Peronne.

Without tanks or protective barrages, the Australian forces overran five German divisions and caused a general withdrawal eastwards towards the Hindenburg Line. The battle resulted in 3000 Australian casualties and the award of eight Victoria Crosses to Australians between 31 August and 2 September 1918.

Plumer

Relevant street

  • Plumer Street, Sherwood

Significance

Field Marshall Herbert Charles Onslow Plumer (1857-1932), 1st Viscount Plumer, GCB, GCMG, GCVO, GBE joined the York and Lancashire Regiment at 19, serving with honour in Sudan and South Africa. By 1911, Plumer was General Officer Commanding-in-Chief for Britain's Northern Command. He commanded V Corps at the Second Battle of Ypres and was promoted to General and given command of the Second Army in 1915. In 1917, Plumer led his troops to victory at the Battles of Messines, Menin Road, Polygon Wood and Broodseinde. He was given command of the British Expeditionary Force and sent to the Italian Front in November 1917. Plumber commanded the British Second Army during the German Spring Offensive and Allied Hundred Days Offensive in the final stages of the First World War.

Pozières

Relevant streets

  • Pozières Road, Tarragindi.

Significance

In late July 1916, Australian troops fought their first action in the Battle of the Somme. By this time, the military strategy had changed from attempting to break through German lines to a series of attacks to capture key positions and wear down the enemy. The Australian 1st Division captured Pozières village between 23-27 July as the Germans counter-attacked with constant barrages of artillery. The 2nd Division attacked Pozières Heights at 12.15am on 29 July without success, sustaining 3500 casualties. Rather than withdraw in failure, the Australians mounted another attack and seized the ridge on 4 August 1916. From here, the 4th Australian Division attacked northwards, capturing Mouquet Farm on 26 September 1916. In the seven weeks of fighting, the three Australian divisions suffered 23,000 casualties, of whom 6800 died.

Table of abbreviations and titles

Abbreviation Title
AIF Australian Imperial Force 
C de G Croix de Guerre
CMG Commander of the Order of the British Empire
DCM Distinguished Conduct Medal
DL Admiral of the Fleet
DSO Companion of the Distinguished Service Order
GCB Knight Grand Cross
GCVO Knight Grand Cross of Royal Victorian Order
OM Order of Merit
SGM Sea Gallantry Medal
VC Victoria Cross

 

09 November 2018