Streets of Remembrance R-Z | Brisbane City Council

Streets of Remembrance R-Z

Find the streets that have received the Rising Sun or Royal Australian Navy badge as part of the Streets of Remembrance project. If you would like more information, phone Council on 07 3403 8888 or by email.

For the meaning of abbreviated titles on this page, view a table with abbreviations and meanings.

Rabaul

Relevant street

  • Rabaul Street, Moorooka

Significance

Australian involvement in World War One began with pledges of support for Britain in its battle with Germany which started on 4 August 1914. The nation’s first military action of the war was the Australian Naval and Military Expeditionary Force landing in September 1914 at Rabaul to take possession of German New Guinea and the neighbouring Bismarck Archipelago. On 9 November 1914, the Royal Australian Navy made a significant contribution when HMAS Sydney destroyed the German raider SMS Emden.

Rochat

Relevant street

  • Rochat Avenue, Banyo

Significance

Phillipe Albert Rochat was born in Geneva, Switzerland and lived in Northgate with his wife and four children when he enlisted in 1916. A motor mechanic by trade, Rochat served with the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Mechanical Transport Co. as a driver and later the 5th Div MT Coy. He left Australia aboard the Persic in December 1916 but was hospitalised with pneumonia for four months before serving in France. Rochat was discharged from service in September 1919.

Romani

Relevant street

  • Romani Street, Ashgrove

Significance

Romani is an Egyptian town where a decisive battle was fought to maintain Allied control of the Suez Canal. From 3-5 August, Australian troops defended Suez from Turkish attempts to seize control. As British forces were stationed in high dunes to the east of the canal, the Turks attacked to the south. The First Australian Light Horse Brigade was in position, but heavily outnumbered and had to fall back. However reinforcements from the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps Mounted Division arrived and the First and Second Light Horse Brigades advanced on foot with bayonets. The Turkish forces collapsed and many were taken prisoner. The Third Light Horse Brigade pursued the retreating Turks.

Rouen

Relevant street

  • Rouen Road, Bardon

Significance

Rouen is a French city on the River Seine whose history goes back to the first century A.D. Rouen was in a relatively safe part of France during the First World War and became a major logistics centre with numerous base hospitals. Commonwealth camps, a base supply depot and the 3rd Echelon of General Headquarters were established in the city. There were also eight general hospitals, including No.1 Australian General Hospital, five stationary hospitals, one British Red Cross hospital and a British hospital for wounded Prisoners of War and No.2 Convalescent Depot.

The hospitals were constantly busy, with staff working long shifts. One Queensland nurse reported standard 12 to 13 hour shifts and wrote in November 1916 that “I should now be sleeping but we had a big convoy last night, shocking cases, I simply ran for ten solid hours without a stop.”

Two Commonwealth war grave cemeteries were established on the outskirts of the city where burials took place. Saint Server Cemetery had 3081 burials and St. Sever Cemetery Extension had 8656 burials.

Runic

Relevant street

  • Runic Street, Bardon

Significance

HMAT A54 Runic was one of His Majesty's Australian Transports (HMAT) ships.

A fleet of transport ships was leased by the Commonwealth government for the specific purpose of transporting the various AIF formations to their respective overseas destinations. When not committed to military transport, these ships were employed to carry various commodity exports to Britain and France. The fleet was made up from British ships and captured German vessels.

HMAT A54 Runic weighed 12,490 tonnes with an average cruise speed of 13 knots or 24 kilometres per hour. It was owned by the Oceanic Steam Navigation Company, Liverpool and leased by the Commonwealth until 27 November 1917. 

Sadlier

Relevant street

  • Sadlier Street, Kedron

Significance

Clifford Sadlier (1892-1964) served in the Medical Corps before embarking on active service in the A.I.F. As a lieutenant in 51st Battalion Sadlier led his company to capture machine gun posts which had been firing on Australian troops at Villers-Bretonneux. He went on to capture many more, despite being wounded twice. Sadlier was awarded the Victoria Cross in 1918 for what official war historian CEW Bean called “an extraordinarily bold attack”, (The AIF in France, 1918, page 1937). 

Salonica

Relevant street

  • Salonica Road, Carina Heights

Significance

Salonica is the Anglicised name for the Greek port of Salonika (Thessalonika) in Macedonia. Allied troops were dispatched from here in October 1915 to assist the Serbian Army facing an invasion by Austrian German forces and the Bulgarian Army. A forced retreat by the Allies resulted in the establishment of a strong defence of the Balkans. British and Canadian hospitals were established in 1916 and Australian nurses were sent to assist the British, French and Canadian nurses there. The area was plagued with malaria, but the protective clothing made it virtually impossible for the nurses to do their work and many fell ill from not wearing it.

Numerous nurses were mentioned in despatches and received the Medal of Military Merit from the King of Greece, Royal Red Cross awards and the Serbian Order of Saint Sava and the Order of Saint John of Jerusalem.

Selvage 

Relevant street

  • Selvage Street, Sunnybank

Significance

John James Selvage was a farmer aged 18 years 5 months when he enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force in January 1916. His parents were Mr W. and Mrs Jane Selvage who lived at Sunnybank, on the South Coast Line. In June 1916, John Selvage arrived in Marseilles suffering from influenza. He was transferred to Etaples in France and rejoined the 49th Battalion in July 1916. Selvage was promoted to Acting Corporal in August 1916. In September he was reported as wounded in action near Mouqet Farm in France. Following numerous enquiries, it was finally determined that he was killed in action at that time. No record or report of his burial was found and in 1921 the army could find no more information about his fate.

Corporal John James Selvage is commemorated on the Sunnybank District Honour Roll for the Great War 1914-18 in the Sunnybank RSL Memorial Hall.

Solomon

Relevant street

  • Solomon Street, Banyo

Significance

‘Joe’ Solomon was born in Kettering, England and was living at Fairney View on the Brisbane Valley rail line with his wife and child when he enlisted in 1917. Solomon joined the Australian Light Horse regiment and embarked at Sydney in May 1917, arriving in Suez in June. In October 1918, Trooper Solomon disappeared in the village of El Kuneitra (sic) and was declared deceased in 1919 after extensive investigation.

Somme 

Relevant street

  • Somme Street, Ashgrove

Significance

The Somme is the site of the costliest battles in the history of the British Army. The name became synonymous with slaughter, with a total of over 620,000 British Commonwealth and French casualties and an estimated 500,000 German casualties between July and November 1916.

Between March and April 1918, the Somme was the site of a major German offensive launched from the Hindenburg line. The German objective was to break the supply lines of the British Expeditionary Force and drive them into the sea. The offensive changed direction to the west, attacking Allied Forces north of the River Somme. Although losing ground, the Allies regrouped to halt the advance east of Amiens.

Stones

Relevant streets

  • Stones Road, Sunnybank
  • Stones Road, Sunnybank Hills

Significance

Charles Edward Francis Stone enlisted from the Sunnybank District in September 1916. Stone, a fruit farmer aged 35 years and 10 months, was married with two children. Stone is one of the members of the Sunnybank District whose names are recorded in gold on an honour board erected at the local railway station. He is commemorated on the Sunnybank District Honour Roll for the Great War 1914-18 in the Sunnybank RSL Memorial Hall.

Stones Road is likely to be a possessive without the apostrophe to avoid the name being a descriptor of the road. It is an entry road to an estate of streets which included soldiers' names - the Model Suburban Settlement for Returned Soldiers, Sunnybank.

Storkey

Relevant streets

  • Storkey Street, Windsor

Significance

Percy Storkey (1893-1969) was a lieutenant in the 19th Battalion, having been wounded on the Western Front in 1916 and at Passchendaele in 1917. During the German Spring Offensive of 1918, Storkey and his platoon unexpectedly encountered a large enemy contingent firing on the Australian troops. The company commander was shot, and although outnumbered, Storkey led a charge which killed or wounded enough of the enemy for the remainder to surrender. For this “conspicuous bravery, leadership and devotion to duty”, (London Gazette, 4 June 1918, page 6775), Storkey was awarded the Victoria Cross in June 1918. He was later promoted to captain and returned to Australia.

Suez

Relevant streets

  • Suez Street, Gordon Park
  • Suez Street, Mitchelton

Significance

The Suez Canal, opened in 1869, was a vital trade link for the British Empire. Following the declaration of World War One, 30,000 British and Indian troops were sent to Egypt to defend the canal. The First Australian and New Zealand Army Corps arrived in December 1914, for training en route to the European theatre of war and to meet the threat posed by the Ottoman Empire. Turkey, an ally of Germany, mounted an action to seize the canal in February 1915. The attack was repelled and Allied defence lines were established 10 kilometres to the east into the Sinai desert.

Suffolk

Relevant street

  • Suffolk Street, Wishart

Significance

HMAT A23 Suffolk was one of His Majesty's Australian Transports (HMAT) ships.

A fleet of transport ships was leased by the Commonwealth government for the specific purpose of transporting the various AIF formations to their respective overseas destinations. When not committed to military transport, these ships were employed to carry various commodity exports to Britain and France. The fleet was made up from British ships and captured German vessels.

HMAT A23 Suffolk weighed 7573 tonnes with an average cruise speed of 12 knots or 22 kilometres per hour. It was owned by the Potter, Trinder and Gwyn, London and leased by the Commonwealth until 14 June 1917.

Suvla

Relevant streets

  • Suvla Street, Balmoral
  • Suvla Street, Nundah

Significance

Suvla Bay is on the Aegean Coast of the Gallipoli Peninsula. The landings here on 6 August 1915 were planned to break the stalemate on the peninsula following the April landings. Five new divisions were to reinforce the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps and capture Koja Chemen Tepe, the highest point on the range. Unfortunately, like Gaba Tepe, the landings were a failure. Suvla Bay was unsurveyed and troops landed on the wrong beach, while boats ran aground 100 metres from shore. The stalemate continued.

Symons

Relevant street

  • Symons Road, Sunnybank Hills

Significance

Lieutenant Colonel William John Symons VC was awarded the Victoria Cross for bravery in December 1915. Symons was born in 1889 at Eaglehawk, Victoria. He enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force in August 1914 when war was declared. Symons had served in the militia for eight years previously. He was assigned to the 7th Battalion as a Sergeant and was among those who landed at Gallipoli on 25th April 1915. He was promoted to Second Lieutenant the following day and to full Lieutenant on 2 July.

On 9 August, during the Battle of Lone Pine, attacks by the Turks severely undermined the Allies' position. Attacks on Jacob's Trench killed or wounded six Australians and it was overrun. Symons' commanding officer ordered him to retake the trench, although he didn't expect Symons to survive. Under fire from three sides, Symons maintained a position which eventually led to the enemy being repelled. Through dogged determination and bravery, Symons erected a timber barricade and constantly repelled enemy attacks. He was awarded the Victoria Cross for his coolness and determination in forcing the enemy to discontinue their attacks.

Symons returned to Australia and was made a commander of a company of the 37th Battalion. He was gassed at Messines in 1917 and fought on the Somme in 1918. Symons was a member of the British Home Guard in World War Two and died in 1948.

Towner

Relevant street

  • Towner Street, Enoggera Army Base
  • Towner Street, Sandgate

Significance

Edgar Towner (1890-1972) enlisted in 1915, and by 1916, was a sergeant serving in Belgium and France in the Australian Machine Gun Corps. He was promoted to lieutenant and twice mentioned in despatches. In June 1918 he won the Military Cross at Morlancourt, France. During the German Spring Offensive at Mont St Quentin, Towner progressively captured three machine gun posts, turning one gun onto the enemy, resulting in their withdrawal and the capture of 25 prisoners.

For his bravery, initiative and devotion to duty, Edgar Towner was awarded the Victoria Cross in December 1918.

Tel-el-Kebir

Relevant street

  • Tel-el-Kebir Street, Mitchelton

Significance

Tel-el-Kebir literally refers to the ‘great mound’ 110 kilometres north of Cairo. During World War One, a small tent city sprang up as it became the training centre for the First Australian Imperial Force reinforcements, the No.2 Australian Stationary Hospital and the site of a prisoner of war camp. A railway was constructed to transport troops from the camp to ships for the Gallipoli landings. In 1916 the 52nd Battalion was raised at Tel-el-Kebir as part of the ‘doubling’ of the Australian Imperial Force.

Turton

Relevant street

  • Turton Street, Sunnybank

Significance

William Turton enlisted from the Sunnybank District before November 1916. Turton is one of the 25 members of the Sunnybank District whose names were recorded in gold on an honour board at the local railway station. No records of his service have been found to date, although the Sunnybank District Honour Roll for the Great War 1914-18 in the Sunnybank RSL Memorial Hall records that he was killed in action.

Vaux

Relevant streets

  • Vaux Street, Ashgrove

Significance

Fort Vaux is a French fort built in the 1880s but captured by the Germans in the Battle of Verdun in 1916. It was used as a command post until abandoned in November 1916 and reclaimed by the French.

In 1918, the battles at Villers-Bretonneux saw the first tank versus tank action between British and German tanks. German tank No.506 Mephisto became stranded in a shell crater and remained inoperative in German-held territory. Following the battle of Hamel, the 7th Australian Infantry Brigade launched successful operations to take the territory south of Villers-Bretonneux. The 26th Battalion successfully took the area to the south and with the 1st Gun Carrier Company recovered Mephisto as a war trophy. It was brought to Australia in 1919 and towed by two Brisbane City Council steamrollers to be displayed at the Queensland Museum.

Mephisto is the only surviving German tank from World War One. It was loaned to the Australian War Memorial from April 2015 to April 2017 for the centenary commemorations and is being restored for permanent display at the Queensland Museum South Bank.

Verdun

Relevant streets

  • Verdun Street, Alderley
  • Verdun Street, Tingalpa

Significance

The Battle of Verdun in 1916 was the longest and costliest single battle of World War One. The battle lasted 300 days and stemmed from a plan by the German Chief of Staff to destroy the French. It was believed that attacking historic forts, dating from the days of Attila the Hun, would draw the French into an all-consuming and fatal battle. The plan failed as the huge numbers of casualties included German soldiers and because the British attack on the Somme Valley, diverted German resources from Verdun. The 10-month battle resulted in as many as 976,000 casualties – over 70,000 casualties for each month of the battle.

Wandilla

Relevant street

  • Wandilla Place, Kuraby

Significance

HMAT A62 Wandilla was one of His Majesty's Australian Transports (HMAT) Ships.

A fleet of transport ships was leased by the Commonwealth government for the specific purpose of transporting the various AIF formations to their respective overseas destinations. When not committed to military transport, these ships were employed to carry various commodity exports to Britain and France. The fleet was made up from British ships and captured German vessels.

HMAT A62 Wandilla weighed 7785 tonnes with an average cruise speed of 16 knots or 30 kilometres per hour. It was owned by the Adelaide Steamship Company, Adelaide and manned by Australian officers and during her service by mainly Australian crews. The Wandilla was leased by the Commonwealth until 24 January 1917.

Warilda

Relevant street

  • Warilda Street, Camp Hill

Significance

HMAT A69 Warilda was one of His Majesty's Australian Transports (HMAT) ships.

A fleet of transport ships was leased by the Commonwealth government for the specific purpose of transporting the various AIF formations to their respective overseas destinations. When not committed to military transport, these ships were employed to carry various commodity exports to Britain and France. The fleet was made up from British ships and captured German vessels.

HMAT A69 Warilda weighed 7713 tonnes with an average cruise speed of 16 knots or 30 kilometres per hour. It was owned by the Adelaide Steamship Company, Adelaide and manned by Australian officers and mainly by Australian crews. The Warilda was torpedoed and sunk by a submarine in the English Channel on 3 August 1918.

Waterlot

Relevant street

  • Waterlot Street, Moorooka

Significance

Waterlot Farm is the site of fierce fighting associated with the 1916 Battle of the Somme, to the south of Longueval. British tanks were used for the first time in this area as delays in communication and confusion caused by orders and counter-orders combined with inclement weather to ground aircraft to result in piecemeal actions and mounting casualties. Australian infantry, artillery and field engineers were stationed here and suffered huge losses as the battles were fought.

White 

Relevant streets

  • White Street, Everton Park
  • White Street, Graceville
  • White Street, Kelvin Grove
  • White Street, Wavell Heights

Significance

General Cyril Brudenell Bingham White (1876-1940) KCB, KCMG, KCVO, DSO joined the 2nd Queensland Regiment in 1896 before transferring to the Royal Australian Artillery and serving in the Boer War. He was a founding member of the new Australian Army following Federation in 1901. In 1912, he became Director of Military Operations at Australian Army Headquarters and organised the training and despatch of the combined Australian and New Zealand troops at the start of World War One. As Chief of Staff of the 1st Australian Division Australian Imperial Force, he planned the Gallipoli landing. As Brigadier General in 1915, he masterminded the 'silent ruse' evacuation of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps in 1915.

In 1917, he successfully discarded piecemeal attacks in the Battle of Menin Road and later victories. White was promoted in the British Army in 1917 after serving under Birdwood.

White returned to Australia in 1919 and worked on the future organisation of the AMF. He became Chairman of the Public Service Board in 1923 and retired in 1928, continuing to serve on a number of boards including that of the Australian War Memorial.

Wiltshire

Relevant street

  • Wiltshire Street, Brighton

Significance

His Majesty's Australian Transports (HMAT) ships - a fleet of transport ships was leased by the Commonwealth government for the specific purpose of transporting the various AIF formations to their respective overseas destinations. When not committed to military transport, these ships were employed to carry various commodity exports to Britain and France. The fleet was made up from British ships and captured German vessels.

HMAT A18 Wiltshire weighed 10,390 tonnes with an average cruise speed of 13.5 knots or 25 kilometres per hour. It was owned by the Commonwealth & Dominion Line, London and leased by the Commonwealth until 2 October 1917.

Woff

Relevant street

  • Woff Street, Sunnybank

Significance

William Lawrence Woff was a 33 year old Sunnybank farmer when he enlisted in the 15th Battalion of the Australian Imperial Force in December 1916. His father, William Woff lived in Cheltenham, Victoria. Woff embarked from Sydney in February 1917 and spent time in Durrington Camp, England before embarking for France in November 1917. Woff was wounded in action in May 1918 and was admitted to hospital in June, having been severely gassed. Private Woff survived the war, but was discharged in London in January 1919 as an invalid. Woff returned to Australia on HMAS Wiltshire, before being discharged here in March 1919.

Private William Lawrence Woff is commemorated on the Sunnybank District Honour Roll for The Great War 1914-18 in the Sunnybank RSL Memorial Hall.

Young

Relevant streets

  • Young Place, Runcorn
  • Young Street, Sunnybank

Significance

H.J. Young and W.D. Young enlisted from the Sunnybank District in World War One. No records of their service have been found to date, although the Sunnybank District Honour Roll for the Great War 1914-18 in the Sunnybank RSL Memorial Hall records that H.J Young was killed in action.

Zeitoun

Relevant streets

  • Zeitoun Street, Mitchelton

Significance

Zeitoun Camp (1914-16) was a training camp north of Cairo from the early days of World War One. In 1914 the New Zealand Expeditionary Force arrived to train in the surrounding desert for operations against the Ottoman Empire. The New Zealand soldiers helped defend the Suez Canal against the Turkish attack and were then sent to join the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force when the Anglo-French attack on the Dardanelles failed.

Zonnebeke

Relevant streets

  • Zonnebeke Street, Moorooka

Significance

Zonnebeke is a town in Belgium in an area where one of the most horrific battles of World War One was fought – the Battle of Passchendaele. This was actually a series of battles in appalling conditions. Muddy fields and mounting casualties in Ypres, Menin Road and Broodseinde Ridge meant the eventual victory came at a huge cost. Nearby Tyne Cot Cemetery contains 11,962 Commonwealth servicemen, 8374 of whom are unidentified.

'Tyne Cot' or Tyne Cottage is the name given to a local barn which housed a number of German 'block houses' or 'pillboxes' used as cover to attack Allied troops. The barn was captured by the 3rd Australian Division on 4 October 1917 in the advance on Passchendaele.

Table of abbreviations and titles

Abbreviation Title
AIF  Australian Imperial Force
DSO Companion of the Distinguished Service Order
KCB Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath
KCMG Knights Commander of the Order of St Michael and St George
KCVO Knight Commander of the Royal Victorian Order
VC Victoria Cross

 

09 November 2018