‘Immersed’ (2018), Boneta-Marie Mabo, Eagle Lane, Brisbane City

Brisbane City Council's Outdoor Gallery transforms Brisbane's laneways and city streets into imaginative, curious, and engaging spaces. Comprising light boxes, banners, vitrines, and evening projections, the Outdoor Gallery displays art outside in city streets, instead of gallery walls. Recently, the Outdoor Gallery has grown to include art projections at Howard Smith Wharves.

The Indigenous Art Program's OUTstanding exhibition will be displayed in the Outdoor Gallery from May to August 2022, and APT10 Kids: Outdoors in partnership with QAGOMA will be on display at Cordelia Street until 2024.

Share your experience of the Outdoor Gallery exhibitions and public programs using #BNEPublicArt.

Indigenous Art Program: OUTstanding

From 7 May to 7 August 2022, explore the OUTstanding exhibition throughout the Outdoor Gallery, featuring new and existing artworks from promising emerging and early career artists.

The 2022 program acknowledges our unsung Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heroes, whose pride and dignity lift their community to their feet in a celebration of strength and determination, and are a catalyst to not only stand tall, but rise.

OUTstanding also speaks to unresolved issues, conciliation and truth-telling in Australia and includes artworks from 12 of Brisbane's most exiting First Nations emerging artists, displayed in light boxes, vitrines, and project video works, integrated into the cityscape.

Find out more about the Indigenous Art Program, including the free public events program.

View our map to help navigate your way around our Outdoor Gallery.

Artist: Jody Rallah

ARTWORK: guides (2022)
LOCATION: edward street, brisbane city - vitrine 2

 

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Artist: Jody Rallah

Jody Rallah is a Yuggera, Biri Gubba and Warangu person of the Brisbane and Bowen regions of Queensland. She works with a variety of mediums and practices, across object making, sculptural installation, painting, sound and performance. Rallah creates knowledge vessels as living embodiments for conversations spanning between generations, by exploring the aliveness of materiality and story.

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Artwork statement

Inspired by Country, the artwork uses weaving as a symbol of connection and resilience. My family and my community are my heroes. Their strength and resilience through extreme adversity and bravery to preserve culture and share through generations live on.

I see them as stars, burning brightly, guiding the way. We need to see our stars and remember their wisdom. The wisdom of Mob and of Country and shared connections through place and time.

Artist: Kyra Mancktelow

artwork: our way (2022)
LOCATION: edward street, brisbane city - vitrine 1

 

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Artist: Kyra Mancktelow

Kyra Mancktelow is a Ngugi, Nunukul woman of Minjerribah and Mulgumpin through her father's line - two of three clans who are the traditional custodians of Quandamooka, also known as Yoolooburrabee, the people of the sand and sea. Through her mother's ancestry, she has connections to the Mardigan people of Cunnamulla.

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Artist statement

This work depicts the achievements and accolades of the matriarchs of my family who have paved the way managing to achieve many goals, whilst overcoming their hardships and struggles as Indigenous women. Through adversity, they have become role models to their family and community.

Artist: Elisa Jane Carmichael

artwork: to nurture (detail) (2020), gulayi for our jandal (women's bag for our women) (2020)
location: irish lane, brisbane city
 

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Artist: Elisa Jane Carmichael

Quandamooka woman Elisa Jane Carmichael is a multidisciplinary artist who honours her saltwater heritage by incorporating materials collected from Country, embracing traditional techniques, and expressing contemporary adaptations through painting, weaving, and textiles. She comes from a family of artists and curators and works closely with her female kin to revive, nurture, and preserve cultural knowledge and practice.

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Artist statement

These works honour the many generations of strong women before us and the women present in my life - the women who raise us, care for us and nuture Country.

I feel a deep spiritual connection to these women through ways of weaving and being on Country. Strand by strand, loop by loop, and gathering with our hands on Quandamooka Country, these woven gulayi (women's bag) and eugaries (shellfish) have supported and sustained life for millenia.

I come from a long line of strong women - our matriarchs who are always around and within us. These women are my heroes.

Artist: LaVonne Bobongie

artwork: blood ties (2019)
location: edison lane, brisbane city
 

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Artist: LaVonne Bobongie

LaVonne Bobongie was of Aboriginal (Olkola), South Sea Islander, Scottish, Fijian and Chinese descent and had a heart for her communities. A freelance photographer for 10 years, she worked closely with Brisbane's local artists, regional and remote communities and internationally.

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Artwork statement

Blood Ties is a work that honours my father, Dennis Bobongie. It speaks to intergenerational strength, support and resilience. My Dad, my son Tai and I are all standing in a cane field in Farleigh, Mackay. These fields are the placeholders of hardship, pain and suffering. They are also reminders of our resilience, our strength, our courage and our endurance to overcome whatever obstacles that were placed in front of us. We are a thriving people. Blood Ties connects us through our family, cultural bonds and responsibilities and our future hopes and dreams. Our past shapes who we are. We will always remember those who have come before us and say - 'We see you, we honour you and we thank you". We will never forget.

Artist: Boneta Marie Mabo

artwork: immersed (series) (2018)
location: eagle lane, brisbane city
 

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Artist: Boneta-Marie Mabo

Boneta-Marie is a contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander visual artist who focuses on many controversial themes. Her artworks take a critical view of social, political and cultural issues based on subjects that directly and indirectly affect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and children.

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Artwork statement

Immersed series is a collection of portraits of First Nations women that celebrates resistance against patriarchal colonialism. The portraits offer a glimpse of individual resistance, power and beauty. The series includes Aboriginal activists Nayuka Gorrie, Meg Rodaughan, Murrawah Maroochy, Dr Chelsea Bon and Melissa Lucashenko. It is a reminder that First Nations people are still here, that sovereignty was never ceded. Even though we are surrounded by ugliness, we immerse ourselves in the fight for equality and justice.

Artist: Dylan Mooney

artwork: empowered (2022)
location: giffin lane, brisbane city
 

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Artist: Dylan Mooney

Dylan Mooney is a proud Yuwi, Torres Strait and South Sea Islander man from Mackay, North Queensland. He works in painting, printmaking, digital illustration and drawing.

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Artwork statement

The work depicts Indigenous peoples as superheroes. The people shown in this work are heroes that Mooney sees as role models to him and within the community. For him, these Mob are doing great things - with real stories behind the characters, the artist brings substance and sincerity to his work. His work shows not just the struggles and hardships we as Indigenous peoples face, but the resilience, innovation and empowerment required for our people to not only survive but to thrive, in so called 'Australia'. The artist also hopes this work will encourage more storytelling from Community and reflecting on Mob who have come before us and have paved the way for the next generation.

Artist: Melissa Stannard

artwork: nhalawilbayn yinar (resist, resist, stand strong aboriginal women) (2022)
location: hutton lane, brisbane city


 

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Artist: Melissa Standard

Melissa Standard is a multi-disciplinary artist, poet, jeweller, researcher, and curator. Storytelling is an important part of her culture and heritage as a Yuwaalaraay, Gamillaraay and Koama woman. Through narrative expression, she shares her personal narratives and lived experiences and expresses cultural and collective traumas. 

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Artwork statement

The Indigenous heroes I have chosen to reflect on are strong Aboriginal women from my matrilineal family, to the often overlooked women and children who were domestic indentured servants and stock women of which my family was included. Many of these people were stolen generations and have had to find ways to heal from their collective trauma and dispersal throughout Australia. I honour their bravery and resistance to the oppressive culture of the time.

Alongside this, I have featured influential Aboriginal women who have had a profound effect on my life, as artists, academics, walgans (aunties) and baawaas (sisters) and these strong, powerful women and knowledge keepers who, inspire, uplift and lead through example - Dr Bianca Beetson and Di Yulawirri Hall.

These assemblages combine photographic images and cyanotype prints, with collected historic ephemera (e.g. surveyor's tripods, antique safe drawers, vintage squatter board game elements and antique ebony dust brushes). Working with these materials from my collections allows me to play with the embedded history within these objects, like the vintage household linens I have printed onto, replete with stains from family dinners, or the embedded memory of tears wiped, and loved shared, these layers of history and meaning allow me to expand upon my chosen narratives.

 

Artist: Mia Boe

artwork: the ashes were buried under the tree (detail, 2021), the nostalgia of mother and child (detail, 2021), leippya (detail, 2022)
location: king george square car park, brisbane city
 

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Artist: Mia Boe

Mia is a painter from Brisbane, with Butchulla and Burmese ancestry. The inheritance and 'disinheritance' of these cultures are the focus of her work. Mia's paintings respond, sometimes obliquely, to the Empire's deliberate, violent interferences with the cultural heritages of Burma and K'gari (Fraser Island).

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Artwork statement

The biggest heroes in my life are my family. Broken and stolen passages of knowledge from generation to generation are a symptom of the colonisation of Australia. I use the tool of nostalgia to imagine futures lost. These are portraits of family members, living and dead, imagined and know, that make up my identity.

Artist: Chris Bassi

artwork: the garden and the sea (2021)
location: fish lane, south brisbane



 

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Artist: Chris Bassi

Chris Bassi (born 1990, Brisbane) is an artist of Meriam, Yupungathi and British descent. Working with archetypal models of representational painting, his work engages with the medium as sociological and historical text and as a means to address issues surrounding cultural identity, alternative genealogies, and colonial legacies in Australia and the South Pacific.

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Artist statement

The Garden and The Sea is a series composed of imagery related to the artist's familiar histories and connection to the landscape of Far North Queensland and the Torres Strait. Moving between themes of personal histories, family, and reflections of self, the work carves our abstract locales of shifting context as an important motif to represent the idea of 'home' as tied to an emotional and physical sense of place. Simultaneously intimate and universal, the works speak to the fragmented nature of both love and belonging.

Artist: Sam Harrison

artwork: the great run-around (2022)
location: howard smith wharves, brisbane city
 

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Artist: Sam Harrison

Sam Harrison is a Brisbane-based artist with both Indigenous (Kamilaroi/Wiradjuri) and English ancestry. His practice spans several different themes from identity, politics and history to memes and a desire to understand the function of humour. 

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Artwork statement

The Great Run-Around is an acknowledgment of the ceaseless courage and self-sacrifice our warriors, elders and community have maintained since first contact. The work draws upon the Emu War, one of the most embarrassing moments in colonial Australian military history to humourously display the government's incompetence, their reliance on violence, and their outlandish desire and attempt at eradication of a people from a land they are innately connected to. 

Artist: Keemon Williams

artwork: first-persons perspective (2019)
location: howard smith wharves, brisbane city
 

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Artist: Keemon Williams

Keemon Williams is a queer interdisciplinary Meanjin (Brisbane) based artist of Koa, Kuku Yalanji and Meriam Mir descent. He utilises a diverse range of mediums and performative elements to interrogate the relationships between location, personal histories and the manifestation of culture in a post-colonial world.

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Artwork statement

First-Persons Perspective depicts a fictional, unnamed deity representative of the past, present and future of First Nations people. It holds space as an omnipotent watcher, bearing witness to tyranny from those in positions of power, and to acts of disrespect in our communities towards the native population. Rendered as a simplistic, two-dimensional form, the work invokes the language of the city via the appropriation of crosswalk signage, encouraging viewers to 'stop' and reflect on the cost of modern life in the bustling city it gazes upon. An allusion to the 'all-seeing eye' of God, the deity reminds its viewer of the gravity of past crimes, as well as the immovable status of Blak Australians as the oldest living culture in the world. The land and its people will never forget. Our ideals and culture will always be the richness in the soil of this lane. We will always be watching.

APT10 Kids

Brisbane City Council in collaboration with the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA), presents Outdoor Gallery exhibition APT10 Kids: Outdoors  currently on display on the Cordelia Street Banner.

Featured artworks have been created by Australian and international artists (and in some instances in collaboration with young people) that celebrate love, inclusion, and diversity, acknowledging the importance of collaboration and community.

Cordelia Street - banner

ARTIST: SHANNON NOVAK IN COLLABORATION WITH MATTHIAS BUTCHER
ARTWORK: MAKE VISIBLE: BRISBANE — A PLACE FOR ALL (2021)

Shannon Novak (Aotearoa New Zealand b.1979) creates socially engaged artworks that aim to inspire positive change for the LGBTQI+ community. He is passionate about creating safe spaces that acknowledge, celebrate and support diversity. He achieves this through his art practice and is also the director of a global LGBTQI+ led non-profit called the Safe Space Alliance, an organisation that helps people identify, navigate, and create safe space for the LGBTQI+ community worldwide.

Make Visible: Brisbane – A Place for All  (2021) features illustrations of different LGBTQI+ family groups. The work reflects the artists’ belief that we can work together to create a more loving and accepting world.  

Creative opportunities

For future exhibition and creative sector opportunities with Council, join the Creative Register.

Outdoor gallery map

Last updated: 16 June 2022
Topics: public art

Brisbane City Council acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of the land and their unique relationship with their ancestral country. We pay respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elders of Brisbane, and recognise their strength and wisdom.